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Evaluating the effects of sedentary behaviour on plantar skin health in people with diabetes

Evaluating the effects of sedentary behaviour on plantar skin health in people with diabetes
Evaluating the effects of sedentary behaviour on plantar skin health in people with diabetes
Background Diabetes-Related Foot Ulcers (DRFUs) are a common and devastating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus and are associated with high morbidity, mortality, social and economic costs. Whilst peak plantar pressures during gait are implicated cited as a major contributory factor, DRFU occurrence has also been associated with increased periods of sedentary behaviour. The present study was designed aimed to assess the effects of sitting postures on plantar tissue health. Methods After a period of acclimatisation, transcutaneous oxygen tensions (TCPO2) and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α and IL-1RA) were measured at the dorsal and plantar aspects of the forefoot before, during and after a 20-min period of seated-weight-bearing in participants with diabetes (n = 11) and no diabetes (n = 10). Corresponding interface pressures at the plantar site were also measured. Results During weight-bearing, participants with diabetes showed increases in tissue ischaemia which were linearly correlated proportional to plantar pressures (Pearson's r = 0.81; p < 0.05). Within the healthy group, no such correlation was evident (p > 0.05). There were also significant increases in post seated weight-bearing values for ratio for IL-1α and IL-1RA, normalised to total protein, post seated weight-bearing in participants with diabetes compared to healthy controls. Conclusion This study shows that prolonged sitting may be detrimental to plantar skin health. It highlights the need to further examine the effects of prolonged sitting in individuals, who may have a reduced tolerance to loading in the plantar skin and soft tissues.
0965-206X
Henshaw, F.R.
a69a722e-9fb6-42b0-b09e-562055e6689c
Bostan, L.E.
9b269056-e210-4ab7-815a-f373528dcd66
Worsley, P.R.
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Bader, D.L.
9884d4f6-2607-4d48-bf0c-62bdcc0d1dbf
Henshaw, F.R.
a69a722e-9fb6-42b0-b09e-562055e6689c
Bostan, L.E.
9b269056-e210-4ab7-815a-f373528dcd66
Worsley, P.R.
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Bader, D.L.
9884d4f6-2607-4d48-bf0c-62bdcc0d1dbf

Henshaw, F.R., Bostan, L.E., Worsley, P.R. and Bader, D.L. (2020) Evaluating the effects of sedentary behaviour on plantar skin health in people with diabetes. Journal of Tissue Viability. (doi:10.1016/j.jtv.2020.09.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background Diabetes-Related Foot Ulcers (DRFUs) are a common and devastating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus and are associated with high morbidity, mortality, social and economic costs. Whilst peak plantar pressures during gait are implicated cited as a major contributory factor, DRFU occurrence has also been associated with increased periods of sedentary behaviour. The present study was designed aimed to assess the effects of sitting postures on plantar tissue health. Methods After a period of acclimatisation, transcutaneous oxygen tensions (TCPO2) and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α and IL-1RA) were measured at the dorsal and plantar aspects of the forefoot before, during and after a 20-min period of seated-weight-bearing in participants with diabetes (n = 11) and no diabetes (n = 10). Corresponding interface pressures at the plantar site were also measured. Results During weight-bearing, participants with diabetes showed increases in tissue ischaemia which were linearly correlated proportional to plantar pressures (Pearson's r = 0.81; p < 0.05). Within the healthy group, no such correlation was evident (p > 0.05). There were also significant increases in post seated weight-bearing values for ratio for IL-1α and IL-1RA, normalised to total protein, post seated weight-bearing in participants with diabetes compared to healthy controls. Conclusion This study shows that prolonged sitting may be detrimental to plantar skin health. It highlights the need to further examine the effects of prolonged sitting in individuals, who may have a reduced tolerance to loading in the plantar skin and soft tissues.

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Evaluating the effects of sedentary behaviour on plantar skin health in people with diabetes - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 1 September 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 September 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444533
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444533
ISSN: 0965-206X
PURE UUID: d29016c9-124c-4119-9fc3-d02fceccf4ce
ORCID for L.E. Bostan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3882-2619
ORCID for P.R. Worsley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0145-5042
ORCID for D.L. Bader: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1208-3507

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Date deposited: 23 Oct 2020 16:31
Last modified: 08 Sep 2021 04:02

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Contributors

Author: F.R. Henshaw
Author: L.E. Bostan ORCID iD
Author: P.R. Worsley ORCID iD
Author: D.L. Bader ORCID iD

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