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Heterogeneity and 'memory' in stem cell populations

Heterogeneity and 'memory' in stem cell populations
Heterogeneity and 'memory' in stem cell populations
Modern single cell experiments have revealed unexpected heterogeneity in apparently functionally 'pure' cell populations. However, we are still lacking a conceptual framework to understand this heterogeneity. Here, we propose that cellular memories – changes in the molecular status of a cell in response to a stimulus, that modify the ability of the cell to respond to future stimuli – are an essential ingredient in any such theory. We illustrate this idea by considering a simple age-structured model of stem cell proliferation that takes account of mitotic memories. Using this model we argue that asynchronous mitosis generates heterogeneity that is central to stem cell population function. This model naturally explains why stem cell numbers increase through life, yet regenerative potency simultaneously declines.
1478-3967
Stumpf, Patrick Simon
3aa7f861-0629-4a6c-a7be-3afd99e11314
Arai, Fumio
6f499041-0756-4b99-a40a-baaa9111221e
Macarthur, Benjamin
2c0476e7-5d3e-4064-81bb-104e8e88bb6b
Stumpf, Patrick Simon
3aa7f861-0629-4a6c-a7be-3afd99e11314
Arai, Fumio
6f499041-0756-4b99-a40a-baaa9111221e
Macarthur, Benjamin
2c0476e7-5d3e-4064-81bb-104e8e88bb6b

Stumpf, Patrick Simon, Arai, Fumio and Macarthur, Benjamin (2020) Heterogeneity and 'memory' in stem cell populations. Physical Biology, 17 (6), [065013]. (doi:10.1088/1478-3975/abba85).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Modern single cell experiments have revealed unexpected heterogeneity in apparently functionally 'pure' cell populations. However, we are still lacking a conceptual framework to understand this heterogeneity. Here, we propose that cellular memories – changes in the molecular status of a cell in response to a stimulus, that modify the ability of the cell to respond to future stimuli – are an essential ingredient in any such theory. We illustrate this idea by considering a simple age-structured model of stem cell proliferation that takes account of mitotic memories. Using this model we argue that asynchronous mitosis generates heterogeneity that is central to stem cell population function. This model naturally explains why stem cell numbers increase through life, yet regenerative potency simultaneously declines.

Text
Stumpf 2020 Phys. Biol. 17 065013 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 September 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 October 2020
Published date: November 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444571
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444571
ISSN: 1478-3967
PURE UUID: 8799a842-8ba5-43cd-be0e-1634979120da

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Date deposited: 26 Oct 2020 17:31
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 19:57

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Contributors

Author: Patrick Simon Stumpf
Author: Fumio Arai

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