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From deep to shallow seas: Antarctic king crab on the move

From deep to shallow seas: Antarctic king crab on the move
From deep to shallow seas: Antarctic king crab on the move
The fauna of decapod crustaceans in the Southern Ocean has historically been considered impoverished, with only about a dozen species of decapod shrimp overall, of which only three species are common and abundant on the Antarctic continental shelf. Crabs and lobsters were assumed to be absent or very rare in the Southern Ocean, mainly ascribed to the physiological constraint of cold polar waters. Polar temperatures have been hypothesized to reduce decapod activity, especially in combination with high magnesium levels in the hemolymph ([Mg2+]HL), as [Mg2+] has a relaxant effect. Mg2+ is abundant in seawater and in combination with polar temperatures causes a relaxant effect in Crustacea (Frederich et al. 2001). Because most crabs are capable of regulating [Mg2+]HL only slightly below the [Mg2+] of seawater, their ability to maintain activity should be hampered (Frederich et al. 2001, Aronson et al. 2015a). In contrast, caridean shrimp regulate [Mg2+]HL to very low levels. The combined effect of low temperatures and high [Mg2+]HL might explain the limits of cold tolerance in decapods and has been put forward as the principal reason for the absence of crabs and lobsters from the high‐polar regions (Frederich et al. 2001, Aronson et al. 2015a). These large, benthic, shell‐crushing decapods, along with shell‐crushing teleosts and elasmobranchs, are important in structuring benthic communities at lower latitudes.
Crustacea, Lithodidae, Southern Ocean, Western Antarctic Peninsula, benthos, cold adaptation, food web, predator, reproduction, temperature
0012-9658
Thatje, Sven
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Smith, Kathryn E.
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Mcclintock, James B.
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Aronson, Richard B.
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Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Smith, Kathryn E.
8313a7a4-1d1b-4989-b96c-52a8c4c3676b
Mcclintock, James B.
0cb66120-7c74-4032-83c8-febbe208c109
Aronson, Richard B.
6a8f363e-1e57-4145-868f-aa5ef46e32fc

Thatje, Sven, Smith, Kathryn E., Mcclintock, James B. and Aronson, Richard B. (2020) From deep to shallow seas: Antarctic king crab on the move. Ecology, 101 (11), [e03125]. (doi:10.1002/ecy.3125).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The fauna of decapod crustaceans in the Southern Ocean has historically been considered impoverished, with only about a dozen species of decapod shrimp overall, of which only three species are common and abundant on the Antarctic continental shelf. Crabs and lobsters were assumed to be absent or very rare in the Southern Ocean, mainly ascribed to the physiological constraint of cold polar waters. Polar temperatures have been hypothesized to reduce decapod activity, especially in combination with high magnesium levels in the hemolymph ([Mg2+]HL), as [Mg2+] has a relaxant effect. Mg2+ is abundant in seawater and in combination with polar temperatures causes a relaxant effect in Crustacea (Frederich et al. 2001). Because most crabs are capable of regulating [Mg2+]HL only slightly below the [Mg2+] of seawater, their ability to maintain activity should be hampered (Frederich et al. 2001, Aronson et al. 2015a). In contrast, caridean shrimp regulate [Mg2+]HL to very low levels. The combined effect of low temperatures and high [Mg2+]HL might explain the limits of cold tolerance in decapods and has been put forward as the principal reason for the absence of crabs and lobsters from the high‐polar regions (Frederich et al. 2001, Aronson et al. 2015a). These large, benthic, shell‐crushing decapods, along with shell‐crushing teleosts and elasmobranchs, are important in structuring benthic communities at lower latitudes.

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Thatje_Ecology_20manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 May 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 June 2020
Keywords: Crustacea, Lithodidae, Southern Ocean, Western Antarctic Peninsula, benthos, cold adaptation, food web, predator, reproduction, temperature

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444769
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444769
ISSN: 0012-9658
PURE UUID: 6ae4a029-3282-47b7-8c7e-99febdcbe4fa

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Date deposited: 04 Nov 2020 17:31
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 20:37

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Contributors

Author: Sven Thatje
Author: Kathryn E. Smith
Author: James B. Mcclintock
Author: Richard B. Aronson

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