The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Black and minority ethnic businesses need support to weather the pandemic

Black and minority ethnic businesses need support to weather the pandemic
Black and minority ethnic businesses need support to weather the pandemic
The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted underlying inequalities that ethnic minorities face in the UK. In England, both death rates and hospital admission rates are more than twice as high for Black people or people from a south Asian background than they are for white people.

The poorer outcomes from COVID-19 among the Black and Asian populations are a result of the underlying social and economic risk factors that ethnic minorities face, such as living in overcrowded accommodation, being employed in riskier lower-skilled jobs, having worse access to healthcare, not to mention structural racism.

But among these well-documented racial inequalities, there is another hidden story: the specific plight of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) business owners who have also been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.
Olarewaju, Tolulope
cc2c5d65-4937-4b1b-921f-dad1bf3a0aac
Tamvada, Jagannadha Pawan
767d0374-3cc1-4822-adb6-f22b7a1f6531
Olarewaju, Tolulope
cc2c5d65-4937-4b1b-921f-dad1bf3a0aac
Tamvada, Jagannadha Pawan
767d0374-3cc1-4822-adb6-f22b7a1f6531

Olarewaju, Tolulope and Tamvada, Jagannadha Pawan (2020) Black and minority ethnic businesses need support to weather the pandemic. The Conversation.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted underlying inequalities that ethnic minorities face in the UK. In England, both death rates and hospital admission rates are more than twice as high for Black people or people from a south Asian background than they are for white people.

The poorer outcomes from COVID-19 among the Black and Asian populations are a result of the underlying social and economic risk factors that ethnic minorities face, such as living in overcrowded accommodation, being employed in riskier lower-skilled jobs, having worse access to healthcare, not to mention structural racism.

But among these well-documented racial inequalities, there is another hidden story: the specific plight of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) business owners who have also been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 30 October 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444799
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444799
PURE UUID: 155abe0b-72f6-48e3-a1cd-d8dbc7570835
ORCID for Jagannadha Pawan Tamvada: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1225-3174

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Nov 2020 17:31
Last modified: 28 Apr 2023 12:45

Export record

Contributors

Author: Tolulope Olarewaju

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×