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Devolution, state personnel, and the production of new territories of governance in the United Kingdom

Devolution, state personnel, and the production of new territories of governance in the United Kingdom
Devolution, state personnel, and the production of new territories of governance in the United Kingdom
As a result of the creation of a Scottish Parliament, Welsh and Northern Irish Assemblies, and the devolution of power to various regional bodies in England, there has been a substantial territorial refocusing of governance within the United Kingdom. Much has been written in the social and political sciences concerning this change, especially with regard to the formation of new institutions of governance. Less is known concerning the connections between state personnel and this institutional and territorial transformation. In this paper we seek to remedy this deficiency. Drawing on empirical evidence from the English regions, we suggest that devolution is shaped by, and also shapes, the actions and strategies of a variety of state personnel in the different territories. Developing the idea of the state as a 'peopled organisation', we thus emphasise the significance of state personnel in actively producing the United Kingdom's new territories and scales of governance. This allows for an examination of the ways in which state personnel, working within different territorial branches and scales of the state, are able to accommodate, revise, or resist broader political projects.
0308-518X
88-109
Jones, Rhys
a146b7b0-1663-44e5-90dc-4abdd6b7ab46
Goodwin, Mark
127d6f53-f455-4b81-bf86-87b5f2ffef3f
Jones, Martin
4d9de4ce-d88e-464c-a53c-7bba6f842aed
Simpson, Glenn
802b50d9-aa00-4cca-9eaf-238385f8481c
Jones, Rhys
a146b7b0-1663-44e5-90dc-4abdd6b7ab46
Goodwin, Mark
127d6f53-f455-4b81-bf86-87b5f2ffef3f
Jones, Martin
4d9de4ce-d88e-464c-a53c-7bba6f842aed
Simpson, Glenn
802b50d9-aa00-4cca-9eaf-238385f8481c

Jones, Rhys, Goodwin, Mark, Jones, Martin and Simpson, Glenn (2004) Devolution, state personnel, and the production of new territories of governance in the United Kingdom. Environment and Planning A, 36 (1), 88-109. (doi:10.1068/a3685).

Record type: Article

Abstract

As a result of the creation of a Scottish Parliament, Welsh and Northern Irish Assemblies, and the devolution of power to various regional bodies in England, there has been a substantial territorial refocusing of governance within the United Kingdom. Much has been written in the social and political sciences concerning this change, especially with regard to the formation of new institutions of governance. Less is known concerning the connections between state personnel and this institutional and territorial transformation. In this paper we seek to remedy this deficiency. Drawing on empirical evidence from the English regions, we suggest that devolution is shaped by, and also shapes, the actions and strategies of a variety of state personnel in the different territories. Developing the idea of the state as a 'peopled organisation', we thus emphasise the significance of state personnel in actively producing the United Kingdom's new territories and scales of governance. This allows for an examination of the ways in which state personnel, working within different territorial branches and scales of the state, are able to accommodate, revise, or resist broader political projects.

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Published date: 1 January 2004

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444819
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444819
ISSN: 0308-518X
PURE UUID: 41d0695e-cc3e-4814-b8dd-ab81e3d9724e
ORCID for Glenn Simpson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1753-942X

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Date deposited: 05 Nov 2020 17:33
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:11

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Contributors

Author: Rhys Jones
Author: Mark Goodwin
Author: Martin Jones
Author: Glenn Simpson ORCID iD

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