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Implementing effective eLearning for scaling up global capacity building: findings from the malnutrition eLearning course evaluation in Ghana

Implementing effective eLearning for scaling up global capacity building: findings from the malnutrition eLearning course evaluation in Ghana
Implementing effective eLearning for scaling up global capacity building: findings from the malnutrition eLearning course evaluation in Ghana

Background: Global demand for capacity building has increased interest for eLearning. As eLearning resources become more common, effective implementation is required to scale up utilization in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs). Objective: This paper describes the process of implementing a malnutrition eLearning course, effectiveness of course delivery models devised, factors affecting course completion, and cost comparison between the models and face-to-face training at healthcare and academic institutions in Ghana. Methods: Four delivery models: Mobile Training Centre (MTC), Online Delivery (OD), Institutional Computer Workstation (ICW) and Mixed Delivery (MD)–a combination of OD and ICW–were determined. Participants were enabled to access the course using one of the four models where contextually appropriate. Pre and post-assessments and questionnaires were administered to compare participants’ course completion status and knowledge gain between delivery models. The effect of access to computer and Internet at home and relevance of course to job and academic progression on course completion were further investigated. Comparison of delivery model costs against face-to-face training was also undertaken. Results: Of 7 academic and 9 healthcare institutions involving 915 people, 9 used MTC (34.8%), 3 OD (18.8%), 3 ICW (34.2%) and 1 MD (12.2%). Course completion was higher among institutions where the course was relevant to job or implemented as part of required curriculum activities. Knowledge gain was significant among most participants, but higher among those who found the course relevant to job or academic progression. The implementation costs per participant for training with MTC were £51.0, OD £2.2, ICW £1.2 and MD £1.1, compared with a face-to-face training estimate of £105.0 (1 GHS = 0.14 GBP). Conclusion: The malnutrition eLearning course makes global capacity building in malnutrition management achievable. Adopting contextually appropriate delivery models and ensuring training is relevant to job/academic progression can enhance eLearning effectiveness in LMICs.

Global capacity building, challenges and opportunities, eLearning delivery, severe acute malnutrition
1654-9716
1-13
Annan, Reginald Adjetey
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Aduku, Nana Esi Linda
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Kyei-boateng, Samuel
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Yuen, Ho
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Pickup, Trevor M
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Pulman, Andrew J
ff04044d-ef72-4ccd-8eac-287c3550e1cd
Monroy-Valle, Michele
32c49d3d-9cc4-4bbb-b1de-8425a8875cf6
Ashworth, Ann
328f0423-c375-40bb-8fd5-420b1d5d480f
Jackson, Alan
c9a12d7c-b4d6-4c92-820e-890a688379ef
Choi, Sunhea
1d0e766d-38d5-4d01-aea7-639c4334334f
Annan, Reginald Adjetey
7fd982e7-9057-4128-88ca-9963e5496aee
Aduku, Nana Esi Linda
18063d37-a57a-4198-8ea7-4f93acce8271
Kyei-boateng, Samuel
f6234c57-a23d-47c8-b8e7-9f0b13a220cc
Yuen, Ho
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Pickup, Trevor M
f7767181-5760-48b8-aaa0-1b3a2c5acb40
Pulman, Andrew J
ff04044d-ef72-4ccd-8eac-287c3550e1cd
Monroy-Valle, Michele
32c49d3d-9cc4-4bbb-b1de-8425a8875cf6
Ashworth, Ann
328f0423-c375-40bb-8fd5-420b1d5d480f
Jackson, Alan
c9a12d7c-b4d6-4c92-820e-890a688379ef
Choi, Sunhea
1d0e766d-38d5-4d01-aea7-639c4334334f

Annan, Reginald Adjetey, Aduku, Nana Esi Linda, Kyei-boateng, Samuel, Yuen, Ho, Pickup, Trevor M, Pulman, Andrew J, Monroy-Valle, Michele, Ashworth, Ann, Jackson, Alan and Choi, Sunhea (2020) Implementing effective eLearning for scaling up global capacity building: findings from the malnutrition eLearning course evaluation in Ghana. Global Health Action, 13 (1), 1-13, [1831794]. (doi:10.1080/16549716.2020.1831794).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Global demand for capacity building has increased interest for eLearning. As eLearning resources become more common, effective implementation is required to scale up utilization in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs). Objective: This paper describes the process of implementing a malnutrition eLearning course, effectiveness of course delivery models devised, factors affecting course completion, and cost comparison between the models and face-to-face training at healthcare and academic institutions in Ghana. Methods: Four delivery models: Mobile Training Centre (MTC), Online Delivery (OD), Institutional Computer Workstation (ICW) and Mixed Delivery (MD)–a combination of OD and ICW–were determined. Participants were enabled to access the course using one of the four models where contextually appropriate. Pre and post-assessments and questionnaires were administered to compare participants’ course completion status and knowledge gain between delivery models. The effect of access to computer and Internet at home and relevance of course to job and academic progression on course completion were further investigated. Comparison of delivery model costs against face-to-face training was also undertaken. Results: Of 7 academic and 9 healthcare institutions involving 915 people, 9 used MTC (34.8%), 3 OD (18.8%), 3 ICW (34.2%) and 1 MD (12.2%). Course completion was higher among institutions where the course was relevant to job or implemented as part of required curriculum activities. Knowledge gain was significant among most participants, but higher among those who found the course relevant to job or academic progression. The implementation costs per participant for training with MTC were £51.0, OD £2.2, ICW £1.2 and MD £1.1, compared with a face-to-face training estimate of £105.0 (1 GHS = 0.14 GBP). Conclusion: The malnutrition eLearning course makes global capacity building in malnutrition management achievable. Adopting contextually appropriate delivery models and ensuring training is relevant to job/academic progression can enhance eLearning effectiveness in LMICs.

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Accepted/In Press date: 29 September 2020
Published date: 22 October 2020
Keywords: Global capacity building, challenges and opportunities, eLearning delivery, severe acute malnutrition

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Local EPrints ID: 444940
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444940
ISSN: 1654-9716
PURE UUID: 89ca4b4a-7033-4123-abe7-f75a9c815b32

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Date deposited: 12 Nov 2020 17:32
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 23:52

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Contributors

Author: Reginald Adjetey Annan
Author: Nana Esi Linda Aduku
Author: Samuel Kyei-boateng
Author: Ho Yuen
Author: Trevor M Pickup
Author: Andrew J Pulman
Author: Michele Monroy-Valle
Author: Ann Ashworth
Author: Alan Jackson
Author: Sunhea Choi

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