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A global meta-analysis of greenhouse gases emission and crop yield under no-tillage as compared to conventional tillage

A global meta-analysis of greenhouse gases emission and crop yield under no-tillage as compared to conventional tillage
A global meta-analysis of greenhouse gases emission and crop yield under no-tillage as compared to conventional tillage

No-tillage (NT) practice is extensively adopted with aims to improve soil physical conditions, carbon (C) sequestration and to alleviate greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions without compromising crop yield. However, the influences of NT on GHGs emissions and crop yields remains inconsistent. A global meta-analysis was performed by using fifty pee-reviewed publications to assess the effectiveness of soil physicochemical properties, nitrogen (N) fertilization, type and duration of crop, water management and climatic zones on GHGs emissions and crop yields under NT compared to conventional tillage (CT) practices. The outcome reveals that compared to CT, NT increased CO 2, N 2O, and CH 4 emissions by 7.1, 12.0, and 20.8%, respectively. In contrast, NT caused up to 7.6% decline in global warming potential as compared to CT. However, absence of difference in crop yield was observed both under NT and CT practices. Increasing N fertilization rates under NT improved crop yield and GHGs emission up to 23 and 58%, respectively, compared to CT. Further, NT practices caused an increase of 16.1% CO 2 and 14.7% N 2O emission in the rainfed areas and up to 54.0% CH 4 emission under irrigated areas as compared to CT practices. This meta-analysis study provides a scientific basis for evaluating the effects of NT on GHGs emissions and crop yields, and also provides basic information to mitigate the GHGs emissions that are associated with NT practice.

Crop yield, GHGs emission, Meta-analysis, Mitigation, No-tillage
0048-9697
1-16
Shakoor, Awais
05cf8898-7b83-42dc-89a6-fe669857584f
Shahbaz, Muhammad
c38dcb9a-28af-47de-ae29-9b98551a6fe6
Farooq, Taimoor Hassan
2b19b52a-f97b-4640-a372-5a104bc21795
Sahar, Najam E.
ac454553-8dbf-4e81-8a05-1bd1aef7eb24
Shahzad, Sher Muhammad
8f3673c5-0298-4bc5-b101-9bcfe207295d
Altaf, Muhammad Mohsin
33fbb750-150b-42a1-bb41-d3f5a0caf1bf
Ashraf, Muhammad
361dfc3b-b644-48a9-8184-950080102f80
Shakoor, Awais
05cf8898-7b83-42dc-89a6-fe669857584f
Shahbaz, Muhammad
c38dcb9a-28af-47de-ae29-9b98551a6fe6
Farooq, Taimoor Hassan
2b19b52a-f97b-4640-a372-5a104bc21795
Sahar, Najam E.
ac454553-8dbf-4e81-8a05-1bd1aef7eb24
Shahzad, Sher Muhammad
8f3673c5-0298-4bc5-b101-9bcfe207295d
Altaf, Muhammad Mohsin
33fbb750-150b-42a1-bb41-d3f5a0caf1bf
Ashraf, Muhammad
361dfc3b-b644-48a9-8184-950080102f80

Shakoor, Awais, Shahbaz, Muhammad, Farooq, Taimoor Hassan, Sahar, Najam E., Shahzad, Sher Muhammad, Altaf, Muhammad Mohsin and Ashraf, Muhammad (2021) A global meta-analysis of greenhouse gases emission and crop yield under no-tillage as compared to conventional tillage. Science of the Total Environment, 750, 1-16, [142299]. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.142299).

Record type: Article

Abstract

No-tillage (NT) practice is extensively adopted with aims to improve soil physical conditions, carbon (C) sequestration and to alleviate greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions without compromising crop yield. However, the influences of NT on GHGs emissions and crop yields remains inconsistent. A global meta-analysis was performed by using fifty pee-reviewed publications to assess the effectiveness of soil physicochemical properties, nitrogen (N) fertilization, type and duration of crop, water management and climatic zones on GHGs emissions and crop yields under NT compared to conventional tillage (CT) practices. The outcome reveals that compared to CT, NT increased CO 2, N 2O, and CH 4 emissions by 7.1, 12.0, and 20.8%, respectively. In contrast, NT caused up to 7.6% decline in global warming potential as compared to CT. However, absence of difference in crop yield was observed both under NT and CT practices. Increasing N fertilization rates under NT improved crop yield and GHGs emission up to 23 and 58%, respectively, compared to CT. Further, NT practices caused an increase of 16.1% CO 2 and 14.7% N 2O emission in the rainfed areas and up to 54.0% CH 4 emission under irrigated areas as compared to CT practices. This meta-analysis study provides a scientific basis for evaluating the effects of NT on GHGs emissions and crop yields, and also provides basic information to mitigate the GHGs emissions that are associated with NT practice.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 September 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 September 2020
Published date: 1 January 2021
Keywords: Crop yield, GHGs emission, Meta-analysis, Mitigation, No-tillage

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445014
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445014
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: d9ae465d-46a7-4dcc-996c-64b86336cb16

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2020 13:16
Last modified: 14 Sep 2021 20:21

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Contributors

Author: Awais Shakoor
Author: Muhammad Shahbaz
Author: Taimoor Hassan Farooq
Author: Najam E. Sahar
Author: Sher Muhammad Shahzad
Author: Muhammad Mohsin Altaf
Author: Muhammad Ashraf

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