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Identifying and managing patients at risk of severe allergic reactions to food: Report from two iFAAM workshops

Identifying and managing patients at risk of severe allergic reactions to food: Report from two iFAAM workshops
Identifying and managing patients at risk of severe allergic reactions to food: Report from two iFAAM workshops

Food allergy affects a small but important number of children and adults. Much of the morbidity associated with food allergy is driven by the fear of a severe reaction and fatalities continue to occur. Foods are the commonest cause of anaphylaxis. One of the aims of the European Union-funded Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management (iFAAM) project was to improve the identification and management of children and adults at risk of experiencing a severe reaction. A number of interconnected studies within the project have focused on quantifying the severity of allergic reactions; the impact of food matrix, immunological factors on severity of reactions; the impact of co-factors such as medications on the severity of reactions; utilizing single-dose challenges to understand threshold and severity of reactions; and community studies to understand the experience of patients suffering real-life allergic reactions to food. Associated studies have examined population thresholds and co-factors such as exercise and stress. This paper summarizes two workshops focused on the severity of allergic reactions to food. It outlines the related studies being undertaken in the project indicating how they are likely to impact on our ability to identify individuals at risk of severe reactions and improve their management.

allergy, anaphylaxis, co-factors, food, severity
0954-7894
1558-1566
Roberts, Graham
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Allen, Katie
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Ballmer-Weber, Barbara
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Clark, Andrew
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Crevel, Rene
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Dunn Galvin, Audrey
df33ae04-bb19-4024-83ed-25c3e3a676e0
Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat
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Grimshaw, Kate E.C.
766b6cf0-347a-447d-aeab-f07366f8ce28
Hourihane, Jonathan O.B.
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Poulsen, Lars K.
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van Ree, Ronald
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Regent, Lynn
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Remington, Ben
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Schnadt, Sabine
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Turner, Paul J.
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Mills, E. N.Clare
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Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Allen, Katie
68f921b7-ca8f-4a24-9fb2-986b458ec903
Ballmer-Weber, Barbara
545f0925-62e6-4a04-acae-848d005850db
Clark, Andrew
f1b648d1-9a6a-41be-9afe-2ccfc5389fad
Crevel, Rene
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Dunn Galvin, Audrey
df33ae04-bb19-4024-83ed-25c3e3a676e0
Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat
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Grimshaw, Kate E.C.
766b6cf0-347a-447d-aeab-f07366f8ce28
Hourihane, Jonathan O.B.
25de726c-3e91-4fc2-9414-e3974bb22daf
Poulsen, Lars K.
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van Ree, Ronald
f6c2aabb-0e67-4e24-b2ed-b9c30641aebc
Regent, Lynn
1013ae26-2e72-4dc5-a0cd-61deabffcbce
Remington, Ben
33f1c44b-8268-48a5-a285-a0ae34a35d94
Schnadt, Sabine
1e55272f-5af0-4da3-9f7b-603d20033bdf
Turner, Paul J.
22cee218-a226-4300-aad1-b9a77ca65915
Mills, E. N.Clare
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Roberts, Graham, Allen, Katie, Ballmer-Weber, Barbara, Clark, Andrew, Crevel, Rene, Dunn Galvin, Audrey, Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat, Grimshaw, Kate E.C., Hourihane, Jonathan O.B., Poulsen, Lars K., van Ree, Ronald, Regent, Lynn, Remington, Ben, Schnadt, Sabine, Turner, Paul J. and Mills, E. N.Clare (2019) Identifying and managing patients at risk of severe allergic reactions to food: Report from two iFAAM workshops. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 49 (12), 1558-1566. (doi:10.1111/cea.13516).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Food allergy affects a small but important number of children and adults. Much of the morbidity associated with food allergy is driven by the fear of a severe reaction and fatalities continue to occur. Foods are the commonest cause of anaphylaxis. One of the aims of the European Union-funded Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management (iFAAM) project was to improve the identification and management of children and adults at risk of experiencing a severe reaction. A number of interconnected studies within the project have focused on quantifying the severity of allergic reactions; the impact of food matrix, immunological factors on severity of reactions; the impact of co-factors such as medications on the severity of reactions; utilizing single-dose challenges to understand threshold and severity of reactions; and community studies to understand the experience of patients suffering real-life allergic reactions to food. Associated studies have examined population thresholds and co-factors such as exercise and stress. This paper summarizes two workshops focused on the severity of allergic reactions to food. It outlines the related studies being undertaken in the project indicating how they are likely to impact on our ability to identify individuals at risk of severe reactions and improve their management.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 October 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 October 2019
Published date: 1 December 2019
Keywords: allergy, anaphylaxis, co-factors, food, severity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445112
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445112
ISSN: 0954-7894
PURE UUID: 77a23ca8-85c0-4adc-9952-07a59739ebbc
ORCID for Graham Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Nov 2020 17:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:49

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Contributors

Author: Graham Roberts ORCID iD
Author: Katie Allen
Author: Barbara Ballmer-Weber
Author: Andrew Clark
Author: Rene Crevel
Author: Audrey Dunn Galvin
Author: Montserrat Fernandez-Rivas
Author: Jonathan O.B. Hourihane
Author: Lars K. Poulsen
Author: Ronald van Ree
Author: Lynn Regent
Author: Ben Remington
Author: Sabine Schnadt
Author: Paul J. Turner
Author: E. N.Clare Mills

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