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Course and outcome of patients with alcohol use disorders following an alcohol intervention during hospital attendance: mixed method study: A mixed method study

Course and outcome of patients with alcohol use disorders following an alcohol intervention during hospital attendance: mixed method study: A mixed method study
Course and outcome of patients with alcohol use disorders following an alcohol intervention during hospital attendance: mixed method study: A mixed method study
Background: Alcohol-related presentations to acute hospitals in the UK are increasing but relatively little is known of the clinical characteristics or natural history of this patient group.

Aims: To describe the clinical characteristics, drinking profile, and trajectory of a cohort of patients with alcohol use disorders attending hospital; and explore participant perspectives of the impact of hospital attendance on their relationship with alcohol.

Method: Mixed method prospective observational cohort study of patients seen by an Alcohol Care Team in an acute hospital. Participants were interviewed using a range of questionnaires at baseline and followed up at six months. A maximum variation sample also completed in-depth qualitative interviews.

Results: 141 patients were recruited, 132 (93.6%) were followed up at six months and 26 completed qualitative interviews. 60/141 (42.6%) stated the index hospital episode included the first discussion of their alcohol use in a secondary care setting. Most rated discussion of their alcohol use in hospital as ‘very positive’ or ‘positive’ (102/141, 72.3%), but the lack of coordinated care with community services undermined efforts to sustain change. At six months 11 (7.8%) patients had died, but in those who survived and completed assessment (n=121), significant clinically meaningful improvements were seen across a range of outcomes, with 55/121 (45.5%) showing a favourable drinking outcome at six months.

Conclusions: Patients with alcohol use disorders have high levels of morbidity and mortality, yet many made substantial changes following intervention in hospital for their alcohol use. Prospective multi-centre trials are needed to identify the specific impact of alcohol care teams in optimising this ‘teachable moment’ for patients.

Alcohol use disorder, cohort, mixed methods, outcome studies
2056-4724
Chambers, Sophia Elaine
144bdaab-9a0e-41d9-b471-6abe343ce375
Sinclair, Julia
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Chambers, Sophia Elaine
144bdaab-9a0e-41d9-b471-6abe343ce375
Sinclair, Julia
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e

Chambers, Sophia Elaine, Sinclair, Julia and Baldwin, David (2020) Course and outcome of patients with alcohol use disorders following an alcohol intervention during hospital attendance: mixed method study: A mixed method study. BJPsych Open, 7 (1). (doi:10.1192/bjo.2020.138).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Alcohol-related presentations to acute hospitals in the UK are increasing but relatively little is known of the clinical characteristics or natural history of this patient group.

Aims: To describe the clinical characteristics, drinking profile, and trajectory of a cohort of patients with alcohol use disorders attending hospital; and explore participant perspectives of the impact of hospital attendance on their relationship with alcohol.

Method: Mixed method prospective observational cohort study of patients seen by an Alcohol Care Team in an acute hospital. Participants were interviewed using a range of questionnaires at baseline and followed up at six months. A maximum variation sample also completed in-depth qualitative interviews.

Results: 141 patients were recruited, 132 (93.6%) were followed up at six months and 26 completed qualitative interviews. 60/141 (42.6%) stated the index hospital episode included the first discussion of their alcohol use in a secondary care setting. Most rated discussion of their alcohol use in hospital as ‘very positive’ or ‘positive’ (102/141, 72.3%), but the lack of coordinated care with community services undermined efforts to sustain change. At six months 11 (7.8%) patients had died, but in those who survived and completed assessment (n=121), significant clinically meaningful improvements were seen across a range of outcomes, with 55/121 (45.5%) showing a favourable drinking outcome at six months.

Conclusions: Patients with alcohol use disorders have high levels of morbidity and mortality, yet many made substantial changes following intervention in hospital for their alcohol use. Prospective multi-centre trials are needed to identify the specific impact of alcohol care teams in optimising this ‘teachable moment’ for patients.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 November 2020
Published date: 2 December 2020
Keywords: Alcohol use disorder, cohort, mixed methods, outcome studies

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445160
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445160
ISSN: 2056-4724
PURE UUID: ec7d8fb1-7083-4754-8d98-73dd2094de99
ORCID for Julia Sinclair: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1905-2025
ORCID for David Baldwin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3343-0907

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Nov 2020 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:39

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Contributors

Author: Sophia Elaine Chambers
Author: Julia Sinclair ORCID iD
Author: David Baldwin ORCID iD

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