The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Body composition analysis by bioelectrical impedance and its relationship with nutritional status in older adults: a cross-sectional descriptive study

Body composition analysis by bioelectrical impedance and its relationship with nutritional status in older adults: a cross-sectional descriptive study
Body composition analysis by bioelectrical impedance and its relationship with nutritional status in older adults: a cross-sectional descriptive study
Currently, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), adults aged ≥ 60 years make up approximately 6% of the total population, and this is predicted to reach around 23% by the year 2050 (1). The expected changes in the age distribution of the population will increase the incidence and prevalence of many chronic diseases (2,3),which are known to occur more commonly in the Saudi older age group (4-6). A poor diet, in addition to sedentary lifestyle and genetics, plays a crucial role in the increased prevalence of many chronic diseases (7,8). For example, the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension in the KSA, which are known risk factors of cardiovascular disease, a major cause of death in the KSA, have reached 49.6%, 25.1%, 32.1% and 30.3%, respectively (9). With ageing, there is a loss of lean body mass (mainly skeletal muscle), an increase in fat mass (10) and a decrease in resting energy expenditure (11). With the loss of muscle comes a loss of strength, and, consequently, older adults may become less active, which contributes to further loss of muscle. On the other hand, national surveys conducted in the KSA show that overweight and obesity have reached high rates in the adult population (12-14), which indicates that KSA is now facing a serious obesity-prevalence crisis. There has, however, been less focus on lean mass, and its functional significance, in the older Saudi population. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess body composition and the relationship between body composition and nutritional status in community dwelling older adults attending primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Riyadh city, KSA
1129-8723
Alhamdan, Adel A.
7813a684-4cbd-457e-82af-a50d8306f978
Al-Muammar, May N.
a27c53ab-2672-4957-836e-1784039050b9
Bindawas, Saad M.
93b4993e-7bf3-4fff-8041-4679aca6e9be
Alshammari, Sulaiman A.
71ee0a5e-b018-4a2a-a152-5df10b7bcad2
Al-Amoud, Maysoon M.
597bc1ff-65b0-407c-b87e-6334f0d278ab
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Alhamdan, Adel A.
7813a684-4cbd-457e-82af-a50d8306f978
Al-Muammar, May N.
a27c53ab-2672-4957-836e-1784039050b9
Bindawas, Saad M.
93b4993e-7bf3-4fff-8041-4679aca6e9be
Alshammari, Sulaiman A.
71ee0a5e-b018-4a2a-a152-5df10b7bcad2
Al-Amoud, Maysoon M.
597bc1ff-65b0-407c-b87e-6334f0d278ab
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Alhamdan, Adel A., Al-Muammar, May N., Bindawas, Saad M., Alshammari, Sulaiman A., Al-Amoud, Maysoon M. and Calder, Philip (2020) Body composition analysis by bioelectrical impedance and its relationship with nutritional status in older adults: a cross-sectional descriptive study. Progress in Nutrition. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Currently, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), adults aged ≥ 60 years make up approximately 6% of the total population, and this is predicted to reach around 23% by the year 2050 (1). The expected changes in the age distribution of the population will increase the incidence and prevalence of many chronic diseases (2,3),which are known to occur more commonly in the Saudi older age group (4-6). A poor diet, in addition to sedentary lifestyle and genetics, plays a crucial role in the increased prevalence of many chronic diseases (7,8). For example, the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension in the KSA, which are known risk factors of cardiovascular disease, a major cause of death in the KSA, have reached 49.6%, 25.1%, 32.1% and 30.3%, respectively (9). With ageing, there is a loss of lean body mass (mainly skeletal muscle), an increase in fat mass (10) and a decrease in resting energy expenditure (11). With the loss of muscle comes a loss of strength, and, consequently, older adults may become less active, which contributes to further loss of muscle. On the other hand, national surveys conducted in the KSA show that overweight and obesity have reached high rates in the adult population (12-14), which indicates that KSA is now facing a serious obesity-prevalence crisis. There has, however, been less focus on lean mass, and its functional significance, in the older Saudi population. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess body composition and the relationship between body composition and nutritional status in community dwelling older adults attending primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Riyadh city, KSA

Text
C-The revised Manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Other.
Request a copy
Text
C-Title, authors, abstract - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Other.
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 November 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445174
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445174
ISSN: 1129-8723
PURE UUID: 779e84d5-9d0a-4940-a26a-37ebf3d7bd6d
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Nov 2020 17:33
Last modified: 11 Mar 2021 02:36

Export record

Contributors

Author: Adel A. Alhamdan
Author: May N. Al-Muammar
Author: Saad M. Bindawas
Author: Sulaiman A. Alshammari
Author: Maysoon M. Al-Amoud
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×