The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Design jam as a pedagogy: teaching design thinking to computer science students at scale

Design jam as a pedagogy: teaching design thinking to computer science students at scale
Design jam as a pedagogy: teaching design thinking to computer science students at scale

Design thinking is an integral component of HCI education. Yet the scale of undergraduate class sizes and limited teaching resources makes the incorporation of traditional studio-based learning challenging. This paper details our deployment of the Design Jam (DJ); a single-day pedagogical exercise for introducing design thinking to two undergraduate classes of >175 computer science undergraduates. Based on thematic analysis of 77 reflective essays and an online survey, we find evidence that the DJ helped to legitimise the design thinking process, engaged students with designerly activities and fostered transferable skills which were later applied to coursework. Yet difficulties emerged with peer learning between DJ attendees and non-Attendees. The paper offers suggestions to prospective DJ facilitators for how the DJ may be leveraged as a means of legitimising design thinking and motivating student engagement and learning among non-designers. Further, how these benefits may be achieved at the scale of modern computer science cohorts and declining instructor/student ratios.

Design Jam, Design process, Design thinking, HCI education, Pedagogy
128-137
Snow, Stephen
1ba928e0-a4d7-4392-ae59-31ac8467eb94
Filipczuk, Dorota
582b73c6-5445-4679-88b5-15d8e1234679
Viller, Stephen
80b73458-c201-407a-8811-21d1096ba4f7
Gomer, Richard
71c5969f-2da0-47ab-b2fb-a7e1d07836b1
Snow, Stephen
1ba928e0-a4d7-4392-ae59-31ac8467eb94
Filipczuk, Dorota
582b73c6-5445-4679-88b5-15d8e1234679
Viller, Stephen
80b73458-c201-407a-8811-21d1096ba4f7
Gomer, Richard
71c5969f-2da0-47ab-b2fb-a7e1d07836b1

Snow, Stephen, Filipczuk, Dorota, Viller, Stephen and Gomer, Richard (2020) Design jam as a pedagogy: teaching design thinking to computer science students at scale. 31st Australian Conference on Human-Computer interactionDecember 2019, , Perth/Fremantle, Australia. 03 - 05 Dec 2019. pp. 128-137 . (doi:10.1145/3369457.3369468).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Design thinking is an integral component of HCI education. Yet the scale of undergraduate class sizes and limited teaching resources makes the incorporation of traditional studio-based learning challenging. This paper details our deployment of the Design Jam (DJ); a single-day pedagogical exercise for introducing design thinking to two undergraduate classes of >175 computer science undergraduates. Based on thematic analysis of 77 reflective essays and an online survey, we find evidence that the DJ helped to legitimise the design thinking process, engaged students with designerly activities and fostered transferable skills which were later applied to coursework. Yet difficulties emerged with peer learning between DJ attendees and non-Attendees. The paper offers suggestions to prospective DJ facilitators for how the DJ may be leveraged as a means of legitimising design thinking and motivating student engagement and learning among non-designers. Further, how these benefits may be achieved at the scale of modern computer science cohorts and declining instructor/student ratios.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 10 January 2020
Venue - Dates: 31st Australian Conference on Human-Computer interactionDecember 2019, , Perth/Fremantle, Australia, 2019-12-03 - 2019-12-05
Keywords: Design Jam, Design process, Design thinking, HCI education, Pedagogy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445189
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445189
PURE UUID: 6b543bfb-f8cb-4176-989f-ceb0b8ee3c09

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Nov 2020 17:30
Last modified: 25 Nov 2020 17:30

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Stephen Snow
Author: Dorota Filipczuk
Author: Stephen Viller
Author: Richard Gomer

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×