The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Trusts, co-ops and crowd workers: could we include crowd data workers as stakeholders in data trust design?

Trusts, co-ops and crowd workers: could we include crowd data workers as stakeholders in data trust design?
Trusts, co-ops and crowd workers: could we include crowd data workers as stakeholders in data trust design?
Data trusts have been proposed as mechanism through which data can be more readily exploited for a variety of aims, including economic development and social-benefit goals such as medical research or policy-making. Data Trusts, and similar data governance mechanisms such as Data Co-Ops, aim to facilitate the use and reuse of datasets across organisational boundaries and, in the process, to protect the interests of stakeholders such as data subjects. However, current discourse on Data Trusts does not acknowledge another common stakeholder in the data value chain – the crowd workers who are employed to collect, validate, curate and transform data. In this paper, we report on a preliminary qualitative investigation into how crowd data workers themselves feel datasets should be used and governed. We find that while overall remuneration is important to those workers, they also value public-benefit data use, but have reservations about delayed remuneration and the trustworthiness of both administrative processes and the crowd itself. We discuss the implications of our findings for how data trusts could be designed, and how data trusts could be used to give crowd workers a more enduring stake in the product of their work.
Gomer, Richard
71c5969f-2da0-47ab-b2fb-a7e1d07836b1
Simperl, Elena
68e2d4e7-e1f7-414b-b478-f8b3f7eb085e
Gomer, Richard
71c5969f-2da0-47ab-b2fb-a7e1d07836b1
Simperl, Elena
68e2d4e7-e1f7-414b-b478-f8b3f7eb085e

Gomer, Richard and Simperl, Elena (2020) Trusts, co-ops and crowd workers: could we include crowd data workers as stakeholders in data trust design? (In Press) (doi:10.1017/dap.2020.21).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Data trusts have been proposed as mechanism through which data can be more readily exploited for a variety of aims, including economic development and social-benefit goals such as medical research or policy-making. Data Trusts, and similar data governance mechanisms such as Data Co-Ops, aim to facilitate the use and reuse of datasets across organisational boundaries and, in the process, to protect the interests of stakeholders such as data subjects. However, current discourse on Data Trusts does not acknowledge another common stakeholder in the data value chain – the crowd workers who are employed to collect, validate, curate and transform data. In this paper, we report on a preliminary qualitative investigation into how crowd data workers themselves feel datasets should be used and governed. We find that while overall remuneration is important to those workers, they also value public-benefit data use, but have reservations about delayed remuneration and the trustworthiness of both administrative processes and the crowd itself. We discuss the implications of our findings for how data trusts could be designed, and how data trusts could be used to give crowd workers a more enduring stake in the product of their work.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 November 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445221
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445221
PURE UUID: 9a22f5ab-3646-4326-a494-ed3ccea9c412

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Nov 2020 17:32
Last modified: 25 Nov 2020 17:32

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Richard Gomer
Author: Elena Simperl

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×