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Deep-ocean climate change impacts on habitats, fish and fisheries

Deep-ocean climate change impacts on habitats, fish and fisheries
Deep-ocean climate change impacts on habitats, fish and fisheries
This publication presents the outcome of a meeting between the FAO/UNEP ABNJ Deep-seas and Biodiversity project and the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative. It

focuses on the impacts of climatic changes on demersal fisheries, and the interactions of these fisheries with other species and vulnerable marine ecosystems. Regional fisheries management organizations rely on scientific information to develop advice to managers. In recent decades, climate change has been a focus largely as a unidirectional forcing over decadal timescales. However, changes can occur abruptly when critical thresholds are crossed. Moreover, distribution changes are expected as populations shift from existing to new areas. Hence, there is a need for new monitoring programmes to help scientists understand how these changes affect productivity and biodiversity. The principal cause of climate change is rising greenhouse gases and other compounds in the atmosphere that trap heat causing global warming, leading to deoxygenation and acidification in the oceans. Three-dimensional fully coupled earth system models are used to predict the extent of these changes in the deep oceans at 200–2500 m depth. Trends in changes are identified in many variables, including temperature, pH, oxygen and supply of particulate organic carbon (POC). Regional differences are identified, indicating the complexity of the predictions. The response of various fish and invertebrate species to these changes in the physical environment are analysed using hazard and suitability modelling. Predictions are made to changes in distributions of commercial species, though in practice the processes governing population abundance are poorly understood in the deep-sea environment, and predicted
638
Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations Rome
Levin, Lisa A.
44c9684c-86c9-4d3e-9b37-27df96d55f72
Baker, Maria
8f846767-b3d5-4e48-b22f-3ead26a56f6d
Thompson, Anthony
c1676a56-3104-43bc-9c83-9baa69dd4782
Levin, Lisa A.
44c9684c-86c9-4d3e-9b37-27df96d55f72
Baker, Maria
8f846767-b3d5-4e48-b22f-3ead26a56f6d
Thompson, Anthony
c1676a56-3104-43bc-9c83-9baa69dd4782

Levin, Lisa A., Baker, Maria and Thompson, Anthony (2019) Deep-ocean climate change impacts on habitats, fish and fisheries (FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper, 638) Rom. Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations Rome 192pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

This publication presents the outcome of a meeting between the FAO/UNEP ABNJ Deep-seas and Biodiversity project and the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative. It

focuses on the impacts of climatic changes on demersal fisheries, and the interactions of these fisheries with other species and vulnerable marine ecosystems. Regional fisheries management organizations rely on scientific information to develop advice to managers. In recent decades, climate change has been a focus largely as a unidirectional forcing over decadal timescales. However, changes can occur abruptly when critical thresholds are crossed. Moreover, distribution changes are expected as populations shift from existing to new areas. Hence, there is a need for new monitoring programmes to help scientists understand how these changes affect productivity and biodiversity. The principal cause of climate change is rising greenhouse gases and other compounds in the atmosphere that trap heat causing global warming, leading to deoxygenation and acidification in the oceans. Three-dimensional fully coupled earth system models are used to predict the extent of these changes in the deep oceans at 200–2500 m depth. Trends in changes are identified in many variables, including temperature, pH, oxygen and supply of particulate organic carbon (POC). Regional differences are identified, indicating the complexity of the predictions. The response of various fish and invertebrate species to these changes in the physical environment are analysed using hazard and suitability modelling. Predictions are made to changes in distributions of commercial species, though in practice the processes governing population abundance are poorly understood in the deep-sea environment, and predicted

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445437
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445437
PURE UUID: 1f7a903e-4266-4808-b804-753507cc150f
ORCID for Maria Baker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-8935

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Dec 2020 17:34
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:47

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Contributors

Author: Lisa A. Levin
Author: Maria Baker ORCID iD
Author: Anthony Thompson

University divisions

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