The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Institutional memory as storytelling: How networked government remembers

Institutional memory as storytelling: How networked government remembers
Institutional memory as storytelling: How networked government remembers
How do bureaucracies remember? The conventional view is that institutional memory is static and singular, the sum of recorded files and learned procedures. There is a growing body of scholarship that suggests contemporary bureaucracies are failing at this core task. This Element argues that this diagnosis misses that memories are essentially dynamic stories. They reside with people and are thus dispersed across the array of actors that make up the differentiated polity. Drawing on four policy examples from four sectors (housing, energy, family violence and justice) in three countries (the UK, Australia and New Zealand), this Element argues that treating the way institutions remember as storytelling is both empirically salient and normatively desirable. It is concluded that the current conceptualisation of institutional memory needs to be recalibrated to fit the types of policy learning practices required by modern collaborative governance.
Cambridge University Press
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Grube, Dennis
398929d8-c9bb-40dd-8fb2-d2e06ba090b4
Lovell, Heather
44cd3359-25a5-476f-8b41-9e365df8469e
Scott, Rodney
ab036a39-b13e-47dc-94f9-af5263278ccd
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Grube, Dennis
398929d8-c9bb-40dd-8fb2-d2e06ba090b4
Lovell, Heather
44cd3359-25a5-476f-8b41-9e365df8469e
Scott, Rodney
ab036a39-b13e-47dc-94f9-af5263278ccd

Corbett, Jack, Grube, Dennis, Lovell, Heather and Scott, Rodney (2020) Institutional memory as storytelling: How networked government remembers (Cambridge Elements Public and Nonprofit Administration, , (doi:10.1017/9781108780001)), Cambridge University Press, 75pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

How do bureaucracies remember? The conventional view is that institutional memory is static and singular, the sum of recorded files and learned procedures. There is a growing body of scholarship that suggests contemporary bureaucracies are failing at this core task. This Element argues that this diagnosis misses that memories are essentially dynamic stories. They reside with people and are thus dispersed across the array of actors that make up the differentiated polity. Drawing on four policy examples from four sectors (housing, energy, family violence and justice) in three countries (the UK, Australia and New Zealand), this Element argues that treating the way institutions remember as storytelling is both empirically salient and normatively desirable. It is concluded that the current conceptualisation of institutional memory needs to be recalibrated to fit the types of policy learning practices required by modern collaborative governance.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: December 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445487
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445487
PURE UUID: db51f3b7-1427-4223-8508-49b187b775f0
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Dec 2020 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:25

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Jack Corbett ORCID iD
Author: Dennis Grube
Author: Heather Lovell
Author: Rodney Scott

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×