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Micromechanical model for rapid prediction of plain weave fabric composite strengths under biaxial tension

Micromechanical model for rapid prediction of plain weave fabric composite strengths under biaxial tension
Micromechanical model for rapid prediction of plain weave fabric composite strengths under biaxial tension
The biaxial properties of plain weave fabric composites are important as they are more representative of the performance under complex loading conditions. Experimental determination of these properties is difficult and Finite Element Analysis provides accurate prediction but is computationally expensive and requires skilled users. To provide a simple and rapid prediction of the strength of plain weave fabric composites under biaxial tension a novel micromechanical model is proposed in this paper. To predict the biaxial tensile strengths the minimum total complementary potential energy principle is used on a micromechanical unit cell where the orthogonally interlaced yarns are idealised as curved beams. The new model is verified with a finite element method model on three warp/weft biaxial loading ratios: 1:1, 2:1 (1:2) and 3:1 (1:3) and uniaxial experimental data. The model is verified on four types of material, ranging in mechanical properties from carbon to glass fibres, and 11 yarn specifications, including five cases compared to experimental results and six cases compared to the FE model, giving a mean error of 9.85% and a maximum error of 16.74% compared to experimental results and a mean error of 10.71% and a maximum error of 14.67% compared to the FE model, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the model. The standard deviation of prediction errors among the 11 cases is 2.66%, which demonstrates the robustness of the model for a range of applications. The proposed model is able to predict the uniaxial and biaxial tensile strengths without experimental investigations at the fabric and laminate level and only requires the yarn mechanical properties and specifications.
Analytical modelling, Biaxial tensile strength, Carbon fibre, Glass fibre, Micromechanical analysis, Plain weave fabric composites
0263-8223
Bai, Jiangbo
a508d25b-8c2f-458e-be9b-9de8475fbb94
Wang, Zhenzhou
794c41fe-f5da-4da4-8f1c-c7beb06f87eb
Sobey, Adam
e850606f-aa79-4c99-8682-2cfffda3cd28
Shenoi, Ajit
a37b4e0a-06f1-425f-966d-71e6fa299960
Bai, Jiangbo
a508d25b-8c2f-458e-be9b-9de8475fbb94
Wang, Zhenzhou
794c41fe-f5da-4da4-8f1c-c7beb06f87eb
Sobey, Adam
e850606f-aa79-4c99-8682-2cfffda3cd28
Shenoi, Ajit
a37b4e0a-06f1-425f-966d-71e6fa299960

Bai, Jiangbo, Wang, Zhenzhou, Sobey, Adam and Shenoi, Ajit (2021) Micromechanical model for rapid prediction of plain weave fabric composite strengths under biaxial tension. Composite Structures, 255, [112888]. (doi:10.1016/j.compstruct.2020.112888).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The biaxial properties of plain weave fabric composites are important as they are more representative of the performance under complex loading conditions. Experimental determination of these properties is difficult and Finite Element Analysis provides accurate prediction but is computationally expensive and requires skilled users. To provide a simple and rapid prediction of the strength of plain weave fabric composites under biaxial tension a novel micromechanical model is proposed in this paper. To predict the biaxial tensile strengths the minimum total complementary potential energy principle is used on a micromechanical unit cell where the orthogonally interlaced yarns are idealised as curved beams. The new model is verified with a finite element method model on three warp/weft biaxial loading ratios: 1:1, 2:1 (1:2) and 3:1 (1:3) and uniaxial experimental data. The model is verified on four types of material, ranging in mechanical properties from carbon to glass fibres, and 11 yarn specifications, including five cases compared to experimental results and six cases compared to the FE model, giving a mean error of 9.85% and a maximum error of 16.74% compared to experimental results and a mean error of 10.71% and a maximum error of 14.67% compared to the FE model, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the model. The standard deviation of prediction errors among the 11 cases is 2.66%, which demonstrates the robustness of the model for a range of applications. The proposed model is able to predict the uniaxial and biaxial tensile strengths without experimental investigations at the fabric and laminate level and only requires the yarn mechanical properties and specifications.

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Paper Manuscript (002) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 28 August 2021.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 August 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 August 2020
Published date: 1 January 2021
Keywords: Analytical modelling, Biaxial tensile strength, Carbon fibre, Glass fibre, Micromechanical analysis, Plain weave fabric composites

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445570
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445570
ISSN: 0263-8223
PURE UUID: 1cb73e3a-682a-48d3-803a-bb8c7d7a8031
ORCID for Adam Sobey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6880-8338

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Dec 2020 17:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:09

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Contributors

Author: Jiangbo Bai
Author: Zhenzhou Wang
Author: Adam Sobey ORCID iD
Author: Ajit Shenoi

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