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DNA stable-isotope probing highlights the effects of temperature on functionally active methanotrophs in natural wetlands

DNA stable-isotope probing highlights the effects of temperature on functionally active methanotrophs in natural wetlands
DNA stable-isotope probing highlights the effects of temperature on functionally active methanotrophs in natural wetlands

Microbial methane (CH 4) oxidation is a major global sink of CH 4. Aerobic CH 4-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) represent a biological model system for CH 4 consumption and is very sensitive to climate warming, but still poorly understood. Here we used DNA stable-isotope probing (SIP) coupled with high-throughput sequencing of 13C-DNA to compare active methanotrophs incubated at 10, 15, 20, and 25 °C in 13CH 4-fed microcosms from two geographically distinct natural wetlands: Sanjiang Plain wetland in northeast China and Haibei wetland in Tibet Plateau. In both wetlands, CH 4 oxidation potential was enhanced with increasing temperature. Community profiling revealed that type I methanotrophs dominated CH 4 oxidation, although a small portion (2.76%–17.14%) of type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis, Methylosinus/Methylocystis) were significantly stimulated at 20 °C and 25 °C. 13C-labeled indicator species included Methylobacter, Methylocystis, and Methylosarcina species in Sanjiang Plain, and Methylobacter and Methylosarcina species in Haibei. Network analysis demonstrated positive co-occurrence of species between genera of Methylobacter, Methylosarcina, and Methylocystis with shifts in temperature, while interspecies interactions between Methylobacter and Methylomonas correlated negatively, and Methylobacter and Methylosinus/Methylocystis positively. Partial least squares path modeling illustrated that the direct effects of temperature on CH 4 oxidation were stronger in northeast China than Tibet Plateau, and temperature could also indirectly influence CH 4 oxidation via shifts in the methanotroph communities. Collectively, these results provide insights into how temperature could influence methanotrophy in natural wetlands under future climate scenarios.

DNA-SIP, Methanotrophs, Natural wetlands, Warming, pmoA
0038-0717
Zhang, Liyan
507829ab-fa08-4b28-9767-44a19364e4f5
Dumont, Marc G.
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Bodelier, Paul L.e.
32eb4088-8cd2-42c4-bbe0-3589ec4db8cc
Adams, Jonathan M.
4b6ebb9c-c9bb-44db-89e5-a0adc453133a
He, Dan
34533cc2-ce86-4154-9f92-dab79b9c4404
Chu, Haiyan
d4f0f658-2b5e-4387-9604-11842a37bcce
Zhang, Liyan
507829ab-fa08-4b28-9767-44a19364e4f5
Dumont, Marc G.
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Bodelier, Paul L.e.
32eb4088-8cd2-42c4-bbe0-3589ec4db8cc
Adams, Jonathan M.
4b6ebb9c-c9bb-44db-89e5-a0adc453133a
He, Dan
34533cc2-ce86-4154-9f92-dab79b9c4404
Chu, Haiyan
d4f0f658-2b5e-4387-9604-11842a37bcce

Zhang, Liyan, Dumont, Marc G., Bodelier, Paul L.e., Adams, Jonathan M., He, Dan and Chu, Haiyan (2020) DNA stable-isotope probing highlights the effects of temperature on functionally active methanotrophs in natural wetlands. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 149, [107954]. (doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2020.107954).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Microbial methane (CH 4) oxidation is a major global sink of CH 4. Aerobic CH 4-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) represent a biological model system for CH 4 consumption and is very sensitive to climate warming, but still poorly understood. Here we used DNA stable-isotope probing (SIP) coupled with high-throughput sequencing of 13C-DNA to compare active methanotrophs incubated at 10, 15, 20, and 25 °C in 13CH 4-fed microcosms from two geographically distinct natural wetlands: Sanjiang Plain wetland in northeast China and Haibei wetland in Tibet Plateau. In both wetlands, CH 4 oxidation potential was enhanced with increasing temperature. Community profiling revealed that type I methanotrophs dominated CH 4 oxidation, although a small portion (2.76%–17.14%) of type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis, Methylosinus/Methylocystis) were significantly stimulated at 20 °C and 25 °C. 13C-labeled indicator species included Methylobacter, Methylocystis, and Methylosarcina species in Sanjiang Plain, and Methylobacter and Methylosarcina species in Haibei. Network analysis demonstrated positive co-occurrence of species between genera of Methylobacter, Methylosarcina, and Methylocystis with shifts in temperature, while interspecies interactions between Methylobacter and Methylomonas correlated negatively, and Methylobacter and Methylosinus/Methylocystis positively. Partial least squares path modeling illustrated that the direct effects of temperature on CH 4 oxidation were stronger in northeast China than Tibet Plateau, and temperature could also indirectly influence CH 4 oxidation via shifts in the methanotroph communities. Collectively, these results provide insights into how temperature could influence methanotrophy in natural wetlands under future climate scenarios.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 August 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 August 2020
Published date: 1 October 2020
Keywords: DNA-SIP, Methanotrophs, Natural wetlands, Warming, pmoA

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445618
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445618
ISSN: 0038-0717
PURE UUID: 0e26246b-b5f0-44e5-a190-8ca7cb89b294
ORCID for Marc G. Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Dec 2020 17:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:25

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