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The upper respiratory tract microbiome of indigenous Orang Asli in north-eastern Peninsular Malaysia

The upper respiratory tract microbiome of indigenous Orang Asli in north-eastern Peninsular Malaysia
The upper respiratory tract microbiome of indigenous Orang Asli in north-eastern Peninsular Malaysia
Much microbiome research has focused on populations that are predominantly of European descent, and from narrow demographics that do not capture the socio-economic and lifestyle differences which impact human health. Here we examined the airway microbiomes of the Orang Asli, the indigenous peoples of Malaysia. A total of 130 participants were recruited from two sites in the north-eastern state of Terengganu in Peninsular Malaysia. Using 16S rRNA sequencing, the nasal microbiome was significantly more diverse in those aged 5–17 years compared to 50+ years (p = 0.023) and clustered by age (PERMANOVA analysis of the Bray–Curtis distance, p = 0.001). Hierarchical clustering of Bray–Curtis dissimilarity scores revealed six microbiome clusters. The largest cluster (n = 28; 35.4%) had a marked abundance of Corynebacterium. In the oral microbiomes Streptococcus, Neisseria and Haemophilus were dominant. Using conventional microbiology, high levels of Staphylococcus aureus carriage were observed, particularly in the 18–65 age group (n = 17/36; 47.2% 95% CI: 30.9–63.5). The highest carriage of pneumococci was in the <5 and 5 to 17 year olds, with 57.1% (4/7) and 49.2% (30/61), respectively. Sixteen pneumococcal serotypes were identified, the most common being the nonvaccine-type 23A (14.6%) and the vaccine-type 6B (9.8%). The prevalence of pneumococcal serotypes covered by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines support introduction into a Malaysian national immunisation schedule. In addition, the dominance of Corynebacterium in the airway microbiomes is intriguing given their role as a potentially protective commensal with respect to acute infection and respiratory health.
Cleary, David
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Morris, Denise
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Anderson, Rebecca
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Jones, Jessica
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Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi
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Rahman, Nor Iza
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Ismail, Salwani
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Razali, Mohamad
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Amin, Rahmah Mohd
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Amin, Rahmah Mohd
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Aziz, Aniza Abd
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Esa, Nor Kamarruzaman
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Amiruddin, Salman
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Chew, Ching Hoong
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Amat Simin, Mohamad Hafis
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Abdullah, Ramle
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Yeo, Chew Chieng
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Clarke, Stuart
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Cleary, David
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Morris, Denise
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Anderson, Rebecca
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Jones, Jessica
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Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi
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Rahman, Nor Iza
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Ismail, Salwani
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Razali, Mohamad
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Amin, Rahmah Mohd
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Amin, Rahmah Mohd
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Aziz, Aniza Abd
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Esa, Nor Kamarruzaman
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Amiruddin, Salman
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Chew, Ching Hoong
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Amat Simin, Mohamad Hafis
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Abdullah, Ramle
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Yeo, Chew Chieng
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Clarke, Stuart
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Cleary, David, Morris, Denise, Anderson, Rebecca, Jones, Jessica, Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi, Rahman, Nor Iza, Ismail, Salwani, Razali, Mohamad, Amin, Rahmah Mohd, Amin, Rahmah Mohd, Aziz, Aniza Abd, Esa, Nor Kamarruzaman, Amiruddin, Salman, Chew, Ching Hoong, Amat Simin, Mohamad Hafis, Abdullah, Ramle, Yeo, Chew Chieng and Clarke, Stuart (2021) The upper respiratory tract microbiome of indigenous Orang Asli in north-eastern Peninsular Malaysia. NPJ Biofilms and Microbiomes, 7 (1), [1]. (doi:10.1038/s41522-020-00173-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Much microbiome research has focused on populations that are predominantly of European descent, and from narrow demographics that do not capture the socio-economic and lifestyle differences which impact human health. Here we examined the airway microbiomes of the Orang Asli, the indigenous peoples of Malaysia. A total of 130 participants were recruited from two sites in the north-eastern state of Terengganu in Peninsular Malaysia. Using 16S rRNA sequencing, the nasal microbiome was significantly more diverse in those aged 5–17 years compared to 50+ years (p = 0.023) and clustered by age (PERMANOVA analysis of the Bray–Curtis distance, p = 0.001). Hierarchical clustering of Bray–Curtis dissimilarity scores revealed six microbiome clusters. The largest cluster (n = 28; 35.4%) had a marked abundance of Corynebacterium. In the oral microbiomes Streptococcus, Neisseria and Haemophilus were dominant. Using conventional microbiology, high levels of Staphylococcus aureus carriage were observed, particularly in the 18–65 age group (n = 17/36; 47.2% 95% CI: 30.9–63.5). The highest carriage of pneumococci was in the <5 and 5 to 17 year olds, with 57.1% (4/7) and 49.2% (30/61), respectively. Sixteen pneumococcal serotypes were identified, the most common being the nonvaccine-type 23A (14.6%) and the vaccine-type 6B (9.8%). The prevalence of pneumococcal serotypes covered by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines support introduction into a Malaysian national immunisation schedule. In addition, the dominance of Corynebacterium in the airway microbiomes is intriguing given their role as a potentially protective commensal with respect to acute infection and respiratory health.

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Accepted/In Press date: 24 November 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 January 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445657
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445657
PURE UUID: 3edc4f5a-f531-465f-a2d3-44d2f76c56aa
ORCID for David Cleary: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4533-0700
ORCID for Stuart Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7009-1548

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jan 2021 17:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:03

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Contributors

Author: David Cleary ORCID iD
Author: Denise Morris
Author: Rebecca Anderson
Author: Jessica Jones
Author: Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi
Author: Nor Iza Rahman
Author: Salwani Ismail
Author: Mohamad Razali
Author: Rahmah Mohd Amin
Author: Rahmah Mohd Amin
Author: Aniza Abd Aziz
Author: Nor Kamarruzaman Esa
Author: Salman Amiruddin
Author: Ching Hoong Chew
Author: Mohamad Hafis Amat Simin
Author: Ramle Abdullah
Author: Chew Chieng Yeo
Author: Stuart Clarke ORCID iD

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