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Anxiety in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Anxiety in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Anxiety in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Growing evidence from observational studies indicates a high prevalence of anxiety in asthma. However, prevalence rates of coexisting anxiety symptoms and comorbid anxiety disorders vary widely across studies. We aimed to evaluate the associations between anxiety and asthma and provide more precise comorbidity estimates. We systematically reviewed the literature from case-controlled studies and conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the pooled prevalence estimates and risks of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders in asthma individuals. Screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were undertaken following PRISMA guidelines for preferred reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analysis. A random-effects model was used to calculate pooled prevalence rates. Meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.3. Multiple databases including PubMed, ScienceDirect, PsychINFO, and PsycARTICLES were searched for publications before 1st December 2019. The review protocol was registered on PROSPERO (ref: CRD42020176028). 19 studies involving 106,813 participants were included. The pooled prevalence of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders in individuals with asthma were 0.32(95% CI, 0.22-0.43) and 0.24 (95% CI, 0.13-0.41), respectively. The risks of coexisting anxiety symptoms and comorbid anxiety disorders were significantly higher in asthma patients than in non-asthma controls indicated by OR= 1.89(95% CI, 1.42-2.52; Z= 4.37; p<0.001) and OR=2.08 (95% CI, 1.70-2.56; Z= 6.97; p<0.001), respectively. Anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders occur at increased frequency among patients with asthma. Our findings highlight the need for appropriate assessments for these comorbid conditions, which may help to identify a subgroup of patients who might benefit from interventions designed to reduce anxiety and enhance quality of life.
Anxiety, asthma, meta-analysis, prevalence, review
0033-2917
11-20
Ye, Gang
fc583a08-c1a8-45d1-a123-527378b71bc2
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Hou, Ruihua
470bdcbc-93a9-4dad-aac5-26d455c34376
Ye, Gang
fc583a08-c1a8-45d1-a123-527378b71bc2
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Hou, Ruihua
470bdcbc-93a9-4dad-aac5-26d455c34376

Ye, Gang, Baldwin, David and Hou, Ruihua (2021) Anxiety in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychological Medicine, 51 (1), 11-20. (doi:10.1017/S0033291720005097).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Growing evidence from observational studies indicates a high prevalence of anxiety in asthma. However, prevalence rates of coexisting anxiety symptoms and comorbid anxiety disorders vary widely across studies. We aimed to evaluate the associations between anxiety and asthma and provide more precise comorbidity estimates. We systematically reviewed the literature from case-controlled studies and conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the pooled prevalence estimates and risks of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders in asthma individuals. Screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were undertaken following PRISMA guidelines for preferred reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analysis. A random-effects model was used to calculate pooled prevalence rates. Meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.3. Multiple databases including PubMed, ScienceDirect, PsychINFO, and PsycARTICLES were searched for publications before 1st December 2019. The review protocol was registered on PROSPERO (ref: CRD42020176028). 19 studies involving 106,813 participants were included. The pooled prevalence of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders in individuals with asthma were 0.32(95% CI, 0.22-0.43) and 0.24 (95% CI, 0.13-0.41), respectively. The risks of coexisting anxiety symptoms and comorbid anxiety disorders were significantly higher in asthma patients than in non-asthma controls indicated by OR= 1.89(95% CI, 1.42-2.52; Z= 4.37; p<0.001) and OR=2.08 (95% CI, 1.70-2.56; Z= 6.97; p<0.001), respectively. Anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders occur at increased frequency among patients with asthma. Our findings highlight the need for appropriate assessments for these comorbid conditions, which may help to identify a subgroup of patients who might benefit from interventions designed to reduce anxiety and enhance quality of life.

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 December 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 January 2021
Published date: January 2021
Keywords: Anxiety, asthma, meta-analysis, prevalence, review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445755
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445755
ISSN: 0033-2917
PURE UUID: 3bab1794-10d1-48d2-8fa2-d65e7119479a
ORCID for David Baldwin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3343-0907
ORCID for Ruihua Hou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6127-1478

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jan 2021 17:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:18

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Contributors

Author: Gang Ye
Author: David Baldwin ORCID iD
Author: Ruihua Hou ORCID iD

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