The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

A compact quad-shank CMOS neural probe with 5,120 addressable recording sites and 384 fully differential parallel channels

A compact quad-shank CMOS neural probe with 5,120 addressable recording sites and 384 fully differential parallel channels
A compact quad-shank CMOS neural probe with 5,120 addressable recording sites and 384 fully differential parallel channels
Large-scale in vivo electrophysiology requires tools that enable simultaneous recording of multiple brain regions at single-neuron level. This calls for the design of more compact neural probes that offer even larger arrays of addressable sites and high channel counts. With this aim, we present in this paper a quad-shank approach to integrate as many as 5,120 sites on a single probe. Compact fully-differential recording channels were designed using a single-gain-stage neural amplifier with a 14-bit ADC, achieving a mean input-referred noise of 7.44 μVrms in the action-potential band and 7.65 μVrms in the local-field-potential band, a mean total harmonic distortion of 0.17% at 1 kHz and a mean input-referred offset of 169 μV. The probe base incorporates 384 channels with on-chip power management, reference-voltage generation and digital control, thus achieving the highest level of integration in a neural probe and excellent channel-to-channel uniformity. Therefore, no calibration or external circuitry are required to achieve the above-mentioned performance. With a total area of 2.2 × 8.67 mm2 and a power consumption of 36.5 mW, the presented probe enables full-system miniaturization for acute or chronic use in small rodents.
Compact recording channel, fully-differential neural amplifier, in vivo electrophysiology, large-scale neural recording, multi-shank, neural probe
1932-4545
1625-1634
Wang, Shiwei
97433cb6-7752-4c68-89f8-933f233d8642
Garakoui, Seyed Kasra
8e9dcf5b-7885-451f-8952-f0f0cc446b07
Chun, Hosung
db6774d1-3085-47aa-9a0f-c4927709fba5
Salinas, Didac Gomez
ea819843-a9fc-46a4-ae6e-fd7ce069ae1c
Sijbers, Wim
d4162c0d-fc59-4139-b0d1-2efce0cae297
Putzeys, Jan
91ca8966-67bd-4b72-82f6-023b78437154
Martens, Ewout
7e2b97e0-b44f-4a35-827f-c9b7835de825
Craninckx, Jan
93e0b054-bda0-4643-9849-f5df62d68af0
Van Helleputte, Nick
bad8e4b6-6d24-440f-97c3-e1ddeda371f1
Lopez, Carolina Mora
b7db9e25-fd8b-4d0e-8e91-2e201640a1eb
Wang, Shiwei
97433cb6-7752-4c68-89f8-933f233d8642
Garakoui, Seyed Kasra
8e9dcf5b-7885-451f-8952-f0f0cc446b07
Chun, Hosung
db6774d1-3085-47aa-9a0f-c4927709fba5
Salinas, Didac Gomez
ea819843-a9fc-46a4-ae6e-fd7ce069ae1c
Sijbers, Wim
d4162c0d-fc59-4139-b0d1-2efce0cae297
Putzeys, Jan
91ca8966-67bd-4b72-82f6-023b78437154
Martens, Ewout
7e2b97e0-b44f-4a35-827f-c9b7835de825
Craninckx, Jan
93e0b054-bda0-4643-9849-f5df62d68af0
Van Helleputte, Nick
bad8e4b6-6d24-440f-97c3-e1ddeda371f1
Lopez, Carolina Mora
b7db9e25-fd8b-4d0e-8e91-2e201640a1eb

Wang, Shiwei, Garakoui, Seyed Kasra, Chun, Hosung, Salinas, Didac Gomez, Sijbers, Wim, Putzeys, Jan, Martens, Ewout, Craninckx, Jan, Van Helleputte, Nick and Lopez, Carolina Mora (2019) A compact quad-shank CMOS neural probe with 5,120 addressable recording sites and 384 fully differential parallel channels. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, 13 (6), 1625-1634. (doi:10.1109/TBCAS.2019.2942450).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Large-scale in vivo electrophysiology requires tools that enable simultaneous recording of multiple brain regions at single-neuron level. This calls for the design of more compact neural probes that offer even larger arrays of addressable sites and high channel counts. With this aim, we present in this paper a quad-shank approach to integrate as many as 5,120 sites on a single probe. Compact fully-differential recording channels were designed using a single-gain-stage neural amplifier with a 14-bit ADC, achieving a mean input-referred noise of 7.44 μVrms in the action-potential band and 7.65 μVrms in the local-field-potential band, a mean total harmonic distortion of 0.17% at 1 kHz and a mean input-referred offset of 169 μV. The probe base incorporates 384 channels with on-chip power management, reference-voltage generation and digital control, thus achieving the highest level of integration in a neural probe and excellent channel-to-channel uniformity. Therefore, no calibration or external circuitry are required to achieve the above-mentioned performance. With a total area of 2.2 × 8.67 mm2 and a power consumption of 36.5 mW, the presented probe enables full-system miniaturization for acute or chronic use in small rodents.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: December 2019
Keywords: Compact recording channel, fully-differential neural amplifier, in vivo electrophysiology, large-scale neural recording, multi-shank, neural probe

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445945
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445945
ISSN: 1932-4545
PURE UUID: ea48ed8c-fdf3-4f77-a369-592a7ee091be
ORCID for Shiwei Wang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5450-2108

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jan 2021 19:20
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:23

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Shiwei Wang ORCID iD
Author: Seyed Kasra Garakoui
Author: Hosung Chun
Author: Didac Gomez Salinas
Author: Wim Sijbers
Author: Jan Putzeys
Author: Ewout Martens
Author: Jan Craninckx
Author: Nick Van Helleputte
Author: Carolina Mora Lopez

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×