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Pilot study: assessing the clinical diagnosis of allergy in atopic children using a microarray assay in addition to skin prick testing and serum specific IgE

Pilot study: assessing the clinical diagnosis of allergy in atopic children using a microarray assay in addition to skin prick testing and serum specific IgE
Pilot study: assessing the clinical diagnosis of allergy in atopic children using a microarray assay in addition to skin prick testing and serum specific IgE

Background: Children with atopic dermatitis (AD) are at risk of developing allergy. Alongside clinical history, testing modalities include skin prick tests (SPT), specific immunoglobulin-E (sp-IgE) and recently, microarray assays. The aim of this pilot study was to assess current tests and the ISAC sIgE-112 system in the diagnosis of food and aeroallergen allergy. Methods: Children aged 0-11 years with moderate to severe AD were included. An initial allergy assessment including clinical history, SPT and sp-IgE was performed to determine food and aeroallergen sensitization. A second independent clinical assessment using the same information given to the first assessor and ISAC test results for food and aeroallergen sensitization was also made for each participant. The results from both were compared. Results: 30 children [mean age 3.91 years (SD 3.3)] were included; 53.3 and 46.7 % had moderate and severe AD, respectively. Sp-IgE tests had a higher percentage of positive results compared to SPT and ISAC tests for common allergens. There was a significant difference between the three tests in detecting aeroallergen sensitization (p = 0.038), especially between sp-IgE and ISAC tests, but no significant difference between the tests for food allergen sensitization. There was good agreement between the two assessors; 70 % of the children had a change in diagnosis, with 60 % having at least one diagnosis added and 40 % having at least one diagnosis removed. Conclusions: There is a role for the use of ISAC testing in diagnosing sensitization and allergy in children with AD as it leads to a change in diagnosis for many patients. Further work is required to assess its clinical and cost effectiveness.

Aeroallergens, Atopic dermatitis, Diagnostic investigations, Food allergy
Foong, Ru Xin
e0631c80-dcb3-49e9-8965-b6a1a71d0c78
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Fox, Adam Tobias
33e89656-5079-4b50-9f91-5605325fda2e
Toit, George
7930b820-e6f7-4c4c-866c-4334017d1106
Foong, Ru Xin
e0631c80-dcb3-49e9-8965-b6a1a71d0c78
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Fox, Adam Tobias
33e89656-5079-4b50-9f91-5605325fda2e
Toit, George
7930b820-e6f7-4c4c-866c-4334017d1106

Foong, Ru Xin, Roberts, Graham, Fox, Adam Tobias and Toit, George (2016) Pilot study: assessing the clinical diagnosis of allergy in atopic children using a microarray assay in addition to skin prick testing and serum specific IgE. Clinical and Molecular Allergy, 14 (1), [8]. (doi:10.1186/s12948-016-0046-z).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Children with atopic dermatitis (AD) are at risk of developing allergy. Alongside clinical history, testing modalities include skin prick tests (SPT), specific immunoglobulin-E (sp-IgE) and recently, microarray assays. The aim of this pilot study was to assess current tests and the ISAC sIgE-112 system in the diagnosis of food and aeroallergen allergy. Methods: Children aged 0-11 years with moderate to severe AD were included. An initial allergy assessment including clinical history, SPT and sp-IgE was performed to determine food and aeroallergen sensitization. A second independent clinical assessment using the same information given to the first assessor and ISAC test results for food and aeroallergen sensitization was also made for each participant. The results from both were compared. Results: 30 children [mean age 3.91 years (SD 3.3)] were included; 53.3 and 46.7 % had moderate and severe AD, respectively. Sp-IgE tests had a higher percentage of positive results compared to SPT and ISAC tests for common allergens. There was a significant difference between the three tests in detecting aeroallergen sensitization (p = 0.038), especially between sp-IgE and ISAC tests, but no significant difference between the tests for food allergen sensitization. There was good agreement between the two assessors; 70 % of the children had a change in diagnosis, with 60 % having at least one diagnosis added and 40 % having at least one diagnosis removed. Conclusions: There is a role for the use of ISAC testing in diagnosing sensitization and allergy in children with AD as it leads to a change in diagnosis for many patients. Further work is required to assess its clinical and cost effectiveness.

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More information

Published date: 19 August 2016
Keywords: Aeroallergens, Atopic dermatitis, Diagnostic investigations, Food allergy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446051
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446051
PURE UUID: 91d33b17-d6a9-4ca7-9cbd-3daac8142f83
ORCID for Graham Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2021 17:33
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:04

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Contributors

Author: Ru Xin Foong
Author: Graham Roberts ORCID iD
Author: Adam Tobias Fox
Author: George Toit

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