The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Primary prevention of asthma and atopy during childhood by allergen avoidance in infancy: a randomised controlled study

Primary prevention of asthma and atopy during childhood by allergen avoidance in infancy: a randomised controlled study
Primary prevention of asthma and atopy during childhood by allergen avoidance in infancy: a randomised controlled study
BACKGROUND: Recent increases in the prevalence of asthma and atopy emphasise the need for devising effective methods for primary prevention in children at high risk of atopy. METHOD: A birth cohort of genetically at risk infants was recruited in 1990 to a randomised controlled study. Allergen avoidance measures were instituted from birth in the prophylactic group (n=58). Infants were either breast fed with mother on a low allergen diet or given an extensively hydrolysed formula. Exposure to house dust mite was reduced by the use of an acaricide and mattress covers. The control group (n=62) followed standard advice as normally given by the health visitors. At age 8, all 120 children completed a questionnaire and 110 (92%) had all assessments (skin prick test, spirometry, and bronchial challenges). RESULTS: In the prophylactic group eight children (13.8%) had current wheeze compared with 17 (27.4%) in the control group (p=0.08). Respective figures were eight (13.8%) and 20 (32.3%) for nocturnal cough (p=0.02) and 11 of 55 (20.0%) and 29 of 62 (46.8%) for atopy (p=0.003). After adjusting for confounding variables, the prophylactic group was found to be at a significantly reduced risk for current wheeze (odds ratio (OR) 0.26 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07 to 0.96)), nocturnal cough (OR 0.22 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.83)), asthma as defined by wheeze and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (OR 0.11 (95% CI 0.01 to 1.02)), and atopy (OR 0.21 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.62)). CONCLUSION: Strict allergen avoidance in infancy in high risk children reduces the development of allergic sensitisation to house dust mite. Our results suggest that this may prevent some cases of childhood asthma.
0040-6376
489-493
Arshad, S.H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Bateman, B.
ccc3fae6-ae01-42e0-85dc-6862540e722c
Matthews, S.M.
d1447741-8267-48ee-a12a-5aa353e6aa77
Arshad, S.H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Bateman, B.
ccc3fae6-ae01-42e0-85dc-6862540e722c
Matthews, S.M.
d1447741-8267-48ee-a12a-5aa353e6aa77

Arshad, S.H., Bateman, B. and Matthews, S.M. (2003) Primary prevention of asthma and atopy during childhood by allergen avoidance in infancy: a randomised controlled study. Thorax, 58 (6), 489-493. (doi:10.1136/thorax.58.6.489).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recent increases in the prevalence of asthma and atopy emphasise the need for devising effective methods for primary prevention in children at high risk of atopy. METHOD: A birth cohort of genetically at risk infants was recruited in 1990 to a randomised controlled study. Allergen avoidance measures were instituted from birth in the prophylactic group (n=58). Infants were either breast fed with mother on a low allergen diet or given an extensively hydrolysed formula. Exposure to house dust mite was reduced by the use of an acaricide and mattress covers. The control group (n=62) followed standard advice as normally given by the health visitors. At age 8, all 120 children completed a questionnaire and 110 (92%) had all assessments (skin prick test, spirometry, and bronchial challenges). RESULTS: In the prophylactic group eight children (13.8%) had current wheeze compared with 17 (27.4%) in the control group (p=0.08). Respective figures were eight (13.8%) and 20 (32.3%) for nocturnal cough (p=0.02) and 11 of 55 (20.0%) and 29 of 62 (46.8%) for atopy (p=0.003). After adjusting for confounding variables, the prophylactic group was found to be at a significantly reduced risk for current wheeze (odds ratio (OR) 0.26 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07 to 0.96)), nocturnal cough (OR 0.22 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.83)), asthma as defined by wheeze and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (OR 0.11 (95% CI 0.01 to 1.02)), and atopy (OR 0.21 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.62)). CONCLUSION: Strict allergen avoidance in infancy in high risk children reduces the development of allergic sensitisation to house dust mite. Our results suggest that this may prevent some cases of childhood asthma.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44628
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44628
ISSN: 0040-6376
PURE UUID: c7e4ca38-d6e4-42e1-b4a0-f9b1ae1eace8

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Mar 2007
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 19:00

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: S.H. Arshad
Author: B. Bateman
Author: S.M. Matthews

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×