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Taking charge of eczema self-management: a qualitative interview study with young people with eczema

Taking charge of eczema self-management: a qualitative interview study with young people with eczema
Taking charge of eczema self-management: a qualitative interview study with young people with eczema
Objectives: To explore young people’s experiences of eczema self-management and interacting with health professionals.

Design: Secondary qualitative data analysis of data sets from two semistructured interview studies. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Setting: Participants were recruited from the UK primary care, dermatology departments and a community-based sample (eg, patient representative groups, social media).

Participants: Data included 28 interviews with young people with eczema aged 13–25 years (mean age=19.5 years; 20 female).

Results: Although topical treatments were generally perceived as effective, young people expressed doubts about their long-term effectiveness, and concerns around the safety and an over-reliance on topical corticosteroids. Participants welcomed the opportunity to take an active role in their eczema management, but new roles and responsibilities also came with initial apprehension and challenges, including communicating their treatment concerns and preferences with health professionals, feeling unprepared for transition to an adult clinic and obtaining treatments. Decisions regarding whether to engage in behaviours that would exacerbate their eczema (eg, irritants/triggers, scratching) were influenced by young people’s beliefs regarding negative consequences of these behaviours, and perceived control over the behaviour and its negative consequences.

Conclusions: Behavioural change interventions must address the treatment concerns of young people and equip them with the knowledge, skills and confidence to take an active role in their own eczema management.
eczema, primary care, qualitative research
2044-6055
1-9
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Ghio, Daniela
68e87380-d790-4f20-b24d-d3ac0ca5765d
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Roberts, Amanda
e6039287-3653-43e2-84ce-22b27db8640d
McNiven, Abigail
5995ea33-23f8-4670-aded-d5f11b10e8b5
Lawton, Sandra
610566de-d907-4721-ac53-6ef72f9e708d
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Ghio, Daniela
68e87380-d790-4f20-b24d-d3ac0ca5765d
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Roberts, Amanda
e6039287-3653-43e2-84ce-22b27db8640d
McNiven, Abigail
5995ea33-23f8-4670-aded-d5f11b10e8b5
Lawton, Sandra
610566de-d907-4721-ac53-6ef72f9e708d
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc

Greenwell, Kate, Ghio, Daniela, Muller, Ingrid, Roberts, Amanda, McNiven, Abigail, Lawton, Sandra and Santer, Miriam (2021) Taking charge of eczema self-management: a qualitative interview study with young people with eczema. BMJ Open, 11 (1), 1-9, [e044005]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2020-044005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: To explore young people’s experiences of eczema self-management and interacting with health professionals.

Design: Secondary qualitative data analysis of data sets from two semistructured interview studies. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Setting: Participants were recruited from the UK primary care, dermatology departments and a community-based sample (eg, patient representative groups, social media).

Participants: Data included 28 interviews with young people with eczema aged 13–25 years (mean age=19.5 years; 20 female).

Results: Although topical treatments were generally perceived as effective, young people expressed doubts about their long-term effectiveness, and concerns around the safety and an over-reliance on topical corticosteroids. Participants welcomed the opportunity to take an active role in their eczema management, but new roles and responsibilities also came with initial apprehension and challenges, including communicating their treatment concerns and preferences with health professionals, feeling unprepared for transition to an adult clinic and obtaining treatments. Decisions regarding whether to engage in behaviours that would exacerbate their eczema (eg, irritants/triggers, scratching) were influenced by young people’s beliefs regarding negative consequences of these behaviours, and perceived control over the behaviour and its negative consequences.

Conclusions: Behavioural change interventions must address the treatment concerns of young people and equip them with the knowledge, skills and confidence to take an active role in their own eczema management.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 December 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 January 2021
Published date: 6 January 2021
Keywords: eczema, primary care, qualitative research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446355
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446355
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: 9067b190-98c1-4481-92dd-92d6d223d259
ORCID for Kate Greenwell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3662-1488
ORCID for Ingrid Muller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9341-6133
ORCID for Miriam Santer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7264-5260

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Feb 2021 17:31
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:09

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Contributors

Author: Kate Greenwell ORCID iD
Author: Daniela Ghio
Author: Ingrid Muller ORCID iD
Author: Amanda Roberts
Author: Abigail McNiven
Author: Sandra Lawton
Author: Miriam Santer ORCID iD

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