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The influence of travel time to health facilities on stillbirths: A geospatial case-control analysis of facility-based data in Gombe, Nigeria

The influence of travel time to health facilities on stillbirths: A geospatial case-control analysis of facility-based data in Gombe, Nigeria
The influence of travel time to health facilities on stillbirths: A geospatial case-control analysis of facility-based data in Gombe, Nigeria
Access to quality emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC); having a skilled attendant at birth (SBA); adequate antenatal care; and efficient referral systems are considered the most effective interventions in preventing stillbirths. We determined the influence of travel time from mother’s area of residence to a tertiary health facility where women sought care on the likelihood of delivering a stillbirth. We carried out a prospective matched case-control study between 1st January 2019 and 31st December 2019 at the Federal Teaching Hospital Gombe (FTHG), Nigeria. All women who experienced a stillbirth after hospital admission during the study period were included as cases while controls were consecutive age-matched (ratio 1:1) women who experienced a live birth. We modelled travel time to health facilities. To determine how travel time to the nearest health facility and the FTHG were predictive of the likelihood of stillbirths, we fitted a conditional logistic regression model. A total of 318 women, including 159 who had stillborn babies (cases) and 159 age-matched women who had live births (controls) were included. We did not observe any significant difference in the mean travel time to the nearest government health facility for women who had experienced a stillbirth compared to those who had a live birth [9.3 mins (SD 7.3, 11.2) vs 6.9 mins (SD 5.1, 8.7) respectively, p=0.077]. However, women who experienced a stillbirth had twice the mean travel time of women who had a live birth (26.3 vs 14.5 mins) when measured from their area of residence to the FTHG where deliveries occurred. Women who lived farther than 60 minutes were 12 times more likely of having a stillborn [OR=12 (1.8, 24.3), p=0.011] compared to those who lived within 15 minutes travel time to the FTHG. We have shown for the first time, the influence of travel time to a major tertiary referral health facility on the occurrence of stillbirths in an urban city in, northeast Nigeria.
1932-6203
Wariri, Oghenebrume
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Onuwabuchi, Egwu
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Korem Alhassan, Jacob Albin
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Dase, Eseoghene
3548270d-4a67-4e86-9c22-99097f24add2
Jalo, Iliya
70eb96b8-475d-4556-85e3-89b49c064556
Laima, Christopher Hassan
c905a89c-351f-411f-8bf0-a86efffa6708
Farouk, Halima Usman
e53ccb0e-ff14-40ac-ab0a-75b01f34a802
El-Nafaty, Aliyu U
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Okomo, Uduak
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Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred
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Wariri, Oghenebrume
be0001b6-357e-47d0-bfd1-2e86d110424e
Onuwabuchi, Egwu
be863216-5078-4530-a83c-ea6c216d5ae0
Korem Alhassan, Jacob Albin
0cad5ba4-ad45-4989-8d8c-d87a63fc12ec
Dase, Eseoghene
3548270d-4a67-4e86-9c22-99097f24add2
Jalo, Iliya
70eb96b8-475d-4556-85e3-89b49c064556
Laima, Christopher Hassan
c905a89c-351f-411f-8bf0-a86efffa6708
Farouk, Halima Usman
e53ccb0e-ff14-40ac-ab0a-75b01f34a802
El-Nafaty, Aliyu U
750e3da8-0a61-4da0-a18e-70476807756f
Okomo, Uduak
db695888-1abf-405b-a4a5-621107b44c7b
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred
11fe21e7-431a-442b-a8c7-6a7cb05176d9

Wariri, Oghenebrume, Onuwabuchi, Egwu, Korem Alhassan, Jacob Albin, Dase, Eseoghene, Jalo, Iliya, Laima, Christopher Hassan, Farouk, Halima Usman, El-Nafaty, Aliyu U, Okomo, Uduak and Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred (2021) The influence of travel time to health facilities on stillbirths: A geospatial case-control analysis of facility-based data in Gombe, Nigeria. PLoS ONE, 16 (1), [e0245297]. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0245297).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Access to quality emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC); having a skilled attendant at birth (SBA); adequate antenatal care; and efficient referral systems are considered the most effective interventions in preventing stillbirths. We determined the influence of travel time from mother’s area of residence to a tertiary health facility where women sought care on the likelihood of delivering a stillbirth. We carried out a prospective matched case-control study between 1st January 2019 and 31st December 2019 at the Federal Teaching Hospital Gombe (FTHG), Nigeria. All women who experienced a stillbirth after hospital admission during the study period were included as cases while controls were consecutive age-matched (ratio 1:1) women who experienced a live birth. We modelled travel time to health facilities. To determine how travel time to the nearest health facility and the FTHG were predictive of the likelihood of stillbirths, we fitted a conditional logistic regression model. A total of 318 women, including 159 who had stillborn babies (cases) and 159 age-matched women who had live births (controls) were included. We did not observe any significant difference in the mean travel time to the nearest government health facility for women who had experienced a stillbirth compared to those who had a live birth [9.3 mins (SD 7.3, 11.2) vs 6.9 mins (SD 5.1, 8.7) respectively, p=0.077]. However, women who experienced a stillbirth had twice the mean travel time of women who had a live birth (26.3 vs 14.5 mins) when measured from their area of residence to the FTHG where deliveries occurred. Women who lived farther than 60 minutes were 12 times more likely of having a stillborn [OR=12 (1.8, 24.3), p=0.011] compared to those who lived within 15 minutes travel time to the FTHG. We have shown for the first time, the influence of travel time to a major tertiary referral health facility on the occurrence of stillbirths in an urban city in, northeast Nigeria.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 December 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 January 2021
Published date: 7 January 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446360
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446360
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 115a40ac-1225-4616-8726-18d62578dc63
ORCID for Winfred Dotse-Gborgbortsi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7627-1809

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Feb 2021 17:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:20

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Contributors

Author: Oghenebrume Wariri
Author: Egwu Onuwabuchi
Author: Jacob Albin Korem Alhassan
Author: Eseoghene Dase
Author: Iliya Jalo
Author: Christopher Hassan Laima
Author: Halima Usman Farouk
Author: Aliyu U El-Nafaty
Author: Uduak Okomo

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