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Early deglacial CO2 release from the Sub-Antarctic Atlantic and Pacific oceans

Early deglacial CO2 release from the Sub-Antarctic Atlantic and Pacific oceans
Early deglacial CO2 release from the Sub-Antarctic Atlantic and Pacific oceans
Over the last deglaciation there were two transient intervals of pronounced atmospheric CO2 rise; Heinrich Stadial 1 (17.5-15 kyr) and the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.5 kyr). Leading hypotheses accounting for the increased accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere at these times invoke deep ocean carbon being released from the Southern Ocean and an associated decline in the global efficiency of the biological carbon pump. Here we present new deglacial surface seawater pH and CO2sw records from the Sub-Antarctic regions of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans using boron isotopes measured on the planktic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides. These new data support the hypothesis that upwelling of carbon-rich water in the Sub-Antarctic occurred during Heinrich Stadial 1, and contributed to the initial increase in atmospheric CO2. The increase in CO2sw is coeval with a decline in biological productivity at both the Sub-Antarctic Atlantic and Pacific sites. However, there is no evidence for a significant outgassing of deep ocean carbon from the Sub-Antarctic during the rest of the deglacial, including the second period of atmospheric CO2 rise coeval with the Younger Dryas. This suggests that the second rapid increase in atmospheric CO2 is driven by processes operating elsewhere in the Southern Ocean, or another region.
CO flux, Heinrich Stadial 1, Southern Ocean, Sub-Antarctic, boron isotopes, deglaciation
0012-821X
Shuttleworth, R.
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Bostock, H.C.
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Chalk, T.B.
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Calvo, E.
481687a9-d3d5-4868-9fe8-08f4955bcc88
Jaccard, S.L.
2ca25b07-e88d-442b-b655-c05fd1f1f79b
Pelejero, C.
c62922ff-6e29-4486-ae8c-7027c01ab71e
Garcia Martinez, A.
aa37bfc1-1546-4f75-a2c8-16b8d93b7ecc
Foster, G.
fbaa7255-7267-4443-a55e-e2a791213022
Shuttleworth, R.
975a2765-3771-4152-b352-46956135f4b0
Bostock, H.C.
a2c12519-6e77-4663-aeb3-37383b10b36f
Chalk, T.B.
0021bbe6-6ab1-4a30-8542-654d0f2d1a0a
Calvo, E.
481687a9-d3d5-4868-9fe8-08f4955bcc88
Jaccard, S.L.
2ca25b07-e88d-442b-b655-c05fd1f1f79b
Pelejero, C.
c62922ff-6e29-4486-ae8c-7027c01ab71e
Garcia Martinez, A.
aa37bfc1-1546-4f75-a2c8-16b8d93b7ecc
Foster, G.
fbaa7255-7267-4443-a55e-e2a791213022

Shuttleworth, R., Bostock, H.C., Chalk, T.B., Calvo, E., Jaccard, S.L., Pelejero, C., Garcia Martinez, A. and Foster, G. (2021) Early deglacial CO2 release from the Sub-Antarctic Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 554, [116649]. (doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2020.116649).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Over the last deglaciation there were two transient intervals of pronounced atmospheric CO2 rise; Heinrich Stadial 1 (17.5-15 kyr) and the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.5 kyr). Leading hypotheses accounting for the increased accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere at these times invoke deep ocean carbon being released from the Southern Ocean and an associated decline in the global efficiency of the biological carbon pump. Here we present new deglacial surface seawater pH and CO2sw records from the Sub-Antarctic regions of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans using boron isotopes measured on the planktic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides. These new data support the hypothesis that upwelling of carbon-rich water in the Sub-Antarctic occurred during Heinrich Stadial 1, and contributed to the initial increase in atmospheric CO2. The increase in CO2sw is coeval with a decline in biological productivity at both the Sub-Antarctic Atlantic and Pacific sites. However, there is no evidence for a significant outgassing of deep ocean carbon from the Sub-Antarctic during the rest of the deglacial, including the second period of atmospheric CO2 rise coeval with the Younger Dryas. This suggests that the second rapid increase in atmospheric CO2 is driven by processes operating elsewhere in the Southern Ocean, or another region.

Text
Shuttleworth et al. Sub Antarctic Deglacial CO2 Release Manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 2 November 2022.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 October 2020
Published date: 15 January 2021
Keywords: CO flux, Heinrich Stadial 1, Southern Ocean, Sub-Antarctic, boron isotopes, deglaciation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446395
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446395
ISSN: 0012-821X
PURE UUID: a7f08677-8bea-4ca8-baaa-3b93c16d58a5
ORCID for T.B. Chalk: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2880-3847
ORCID for G. Foster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3688-9668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Feb 2021 17:33
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:09

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Contributors

Author: R. Shuttleworth
Author: H.C. Bostock
Author: T.B. Chalk ORCID iD
Author: E. Calvo
Author: S.L. Jaccard
Author: C. Pelejero
Author: A. Garcia Martinez
Author: G. Foster ORCID iD

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