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Characterisation of atopic and non-atopic wheeze in 10 year old children

Characterisation of atopic and non-atopic wheeze in 10 year old children
Characterisation of atopic and non-atopic wheeze in 10 year old children

BACKGROUND: Wheezing occurs in both atopic and non-atopic children. The characteristics of atopic and non-atopic wheeze in children at 10 years of age were assessed and attempts made to identify whether different mechanisms underlie these states.

METHODS: Children were seen at birth and at 1, 2, 4 and 10 years of age in a whole population birth cohort study (n = 1456; 1373 seen at 10 years). Information was collected prospectively on inherited and early life environmental risk factors for wheezing. Skin prick testing, spirometry, and methacholine bronchial challenge were conducted at 10 years. Wheezing at 10 years of age was considered atopic or non-atopic depending on the results of the skin prick test. Independent significant risk factors for atopic and non-atopic wheeze were determined by logistic regression.

RESULTS: Atopic (10.9%) and non-atopic (9.7%) wheeze were equally common at 10 years of age. Greater bronchial hyperresponsiveness (p<0.001) and airways obstruction (p = 0.011) occurred in children with atopic wheeze than in those with non-atopic wheeze at 10 years. Children with atopic wheeze more often received treatment (p<0.001) or an asthma diagnosis for their disorder, although current morbidity at 10 years differed little for these states. Maternal asthma and recurrent chest infections at 2 years were independently significant factors for developing non-atopic wheeze. For atopic wheeze, sibling asthma, eczema at 1 year, rhinitis at 4 years, and male sex were independently significant.

CONCLUSIONS: Non-atopic wheeze is as common as atopic wheeze in children aged 10 years, but treatment is more frequent in those with atopic wheeze. Different risk factor profiles appear relevant to the presence of atopic and non-atopic wheeze at 10 years of age.

Age of Onset, Asthma/complications, Child, Cohort Studies, Female, Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology, Humans, Hypersensitivity/complications, Male, Maternal Exposure, Pedigree, Prospective Studies, Recurrence, Respiratory Sounds/etiology, Respiratory Tract Infections/genetics, Risk Factors, Social Class, Vital Capacity/physiology
0040-6376
563-568
Kurukulaaratchy, R J
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Fenn, M
8fe24028-c9e6-465d-ba76-78b5a1fb129f
Arshad, S H
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Kurukulaaratchy, R J
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Fenn, M
8fe24028-c9e6-465d-ba76-78b5a1fb129f
Arshad, S H
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958

Kurukulaaratchy, R J, Fenn, M and Arshad, S H (2004) Characterisation of atopic and non-atopic wheeze in 10 year old children. Thorax, 59 (7), 563-568. (doi:10.1136/thx.2003.010462).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Wheezing occurs in both atopic and non-atopic children. The characteristics of atopic and non-atopic wheeze in children at 10 years of age were assessed and attempts made to identify whether different mechanisms underlie these states.

METHODS: Children were seen at birth and at 1, 2, 4 and 10 years of age in a whole population birth cohort study (n = 1456; 1373 seen at 10 years). Information was collected prospectively on inherited and early life environmental risk factors for wheezing. Skin prick testing, spirometry, and methacholine bronchial challenge were conducted at 10 years. Wheezing at 10 years of age was considered atopic or non-atopic depending on the results of the skin prick test. Independent significant risk factors for atopic and non-atopic wheeze were determined by logistic regression.

RESULTS: Atopic (10.9%) and non-atopic (9.7%) wheeze were equally common at 10 years of age. Greater bronchial hyperresponsiveness (p<0.001) and airways obstruction (p = 0.011) occurred in children with atopic wheeze than in those with non-atopic wheeze at 10 years. Children with atopic wheeze more often received treatment (p<0.001) or an asthma diagnosis for their disorder, although current morbidity at 10 years differed little for these states. Maternal asthma and recurrent chest infections at 2 years were independently significant factors for developing non-atopic wheeze. For atopic wheeze, sibling asthma, eczema at 1 year, rhinitis at 4 years, and male sex were independently significant.

CONCLUSIONS: Non-atopic wheeze is as common as atopic wheeze in children aged 10 years, but treatment is more frequent in those with atopic wheeze. Different risk factor profiles appear relevant to the presence of atopic and non-atopic wheeze at 10 years of age.

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More information

Published date: 28 July 2004
Keywords: Age of Onset, Asthma/complications, Child, Cohort Studies, Female, Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology, Humans, Hypersensitivity/complications, Male, Maternal Exposure, Pedigree, Prospective Studies, Recurrence, Respiratory Sounds/etiology, Respiratory Tract Infections/genetics, Risk Factors, Social Class, Vital Capacity/physiology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446442
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446442
ISSN: 0040-6376
PURE UUID: aeab7b77-58f9-46ab-a418-c3c5e02db501
ORCID for R J Kurukulaaratchy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1588-2400

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Date deposited: 10 Feb 2021 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:54

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Contributors

Author: M Fenn
Author: S H Arshad

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