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Early drug treatment in childhood asthma

Early drug treatment in childhood asthma
Early drug treatment in childhood asthma

Childhood asthma is an increasingly common problem. It is now known that asthma shares similar underlying inflammatory mechanisms to the other major atopic states (rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy). The notion of an 'allergic march' has been developed to describe the phenomenon by which an atopic individual may exhibit characteristically different atopic states as they grow older. As a result of such knowledge anti-inflammatory strategies have become central to attempts both to prevent as well as to treat asthma during childhood. In some studies children with early atopy such as atopic dermatitis were treated in an attempt to prevent later onset of asthma. It has been proposed that antihistamines might prove effective for this role and in the first part of this review the results of the recently concluded Early Treatment of the Atopic Child study are considered. In the second part, the efficacy and safety of an already widely employed anti-inflammatory strategy, the use of 'early' inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of asthma in children, is examined.

Allergic march, Antihistamines, Atopy, Childhood asthma, Inflammation, Inhaled steroids, Primary prevention, Treatment
1087-2434
147-152
Kurukulaaratchy, R. J.
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Arshad, S. H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Kurukulaaratchy, R. J.
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Arshad, S. H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958

Kurukulaaratchy, R. J. and Arshad, S. H. (1998) Early drug treatment in childhood asthma. Clinical Asthma Reviews, 2 (4), 147-152.

Record type: Review

Abstract

Childhood asthma is an increasingly common problem. It is now known that asthma shares similar underlying inflammatory mechanisms to the other major atopic states (rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy). The notion of an 'allergic march' has been developed to describe the phenomenon by which an atopic individual may exhibit characteristically different atopic states as they grow older. As a result of such knowledge anti-inflammatory strategies have become central to attempts both to prevent as well as to treat asthma during childhood. In some studies children with early atopy such as atopic dermatitis were treated in an attempt to prevent later onset of asthma. It has been proposed that antihistamines might prove effective for this role and in the first part of this review the results of the recently concluded Early Treatment of the Atopic Child study are considered. In the second part, the efficacy and safety of an already widely employed anti-inflammatory strategy, the use of 'early' inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of asthma in children, is examined.

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More information

Published date: 1998
Additional Information: Copyright 2004 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Allergic march, Antihistamines, Atopy, Childhood asthma, Inflammation, Inhaled steroids, Primary prevention, Treatment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446443
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446443
ISSN: 1087-2434
PURE UUID: d9cfb860-b714-4a7a-94c2-fbf8958d09d9
ORCID for R. J. Kurukulaaratchy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1588-2400

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Feb 2021 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:54

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