The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Does environment mediate earlier onset of the persistent childhood asthma phenotype?

Does environment mediate earlier onset of the persistent childhood asthma phenotype?
Does environment mediate earlier onset of the persistent childhood asthma phenotype?

Objective. We investigated the role of environmental and hereditary factors in determining whether persistent childhood wheezing phenotypes had an early or late onset.

Methods. In a whole population birth cohort (n = 1456), children were seen at birth and at 1, 2, 4, and 10 years. At each visit, information was collected prospectively regarding wheeze prevalence and used to classify subjects into wheezing phenotypes. Information on genetic and environmental risk factors in early life was also obtained prospectively, and skin-prick testing to common allergens was performed at 4 years.

Results. Early-onset persistent wheezers (n = 125) had wheeze onset in the first 4 years, still present at age 10, whereas late-onset persistent wheezers (n = 81) had wheeze onset after age 4 years that was still present at 10 years. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified independent significance only for inherited factors (parental asthma, family history of rhinitis, eczema at 4 years, and atopic status at 4 years) in the development of late-onset persistent wheeze. However, low social class at birth, recurrent chest infections at 2 years, and parental smoking at 2 years plus inherited factors (eczema at 2 years; food allergy at 4 years; maternal asthma, sibling asthma, maternal urticaria, and atopic status at 4 years) demonstrated independent significance for early-onset persistent wheeze.

Conclusion. Inheritance seems to be of prime significance in the cause of persistent childhood wheeze. Environmental exposure in early life may combine with this tendency to produce an early onset of persistent wheeze. Absence of these environmental factors might delay but not prevent the onset of wheeze in children with atopic heredity.

Age of Onset, Asthma/complications, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Eczema/complications, Environment, Female, Humans, Hypersensitivity/complications, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Logistic Models, Male, Phenotype, Prevalence, Respiratory Sounds/etiology, Rhinitis/complications, Risk Factors, Tobacco Smoke Pollution, United Kingdom/epidemiology
0031-4005
345- 350
Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh J.
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Matthews, Sharon
da71ceaa-c974-4fda-aea0-13c7cdecaf04
Arshad, S. Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh J.
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Matthews, Sharon
da71ceaa-c974-4fda-aea0-13c7cdecaf04
Arshad, S. Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958

Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh J., Matthews, Sharon and Arshad, S. Hasan (2004) Does environment mediate earlier onset of the persistent childhood asthma phenotype? Pediatrics, 113 (2), 345- 350. (doi:10.1542/peds.113.2.345).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective. We investigated the role of environmental and hereditary factors in determining whether persistent childhood wheezing phenotypes had an early or late onset.

Methods. In a whole population birth cohort (n = 1456), children were seen at birth and at 1, 2, 4, and 10 years. At each visit, information was collected prospectively regarding wheeze prevalence and used to classify subjects into wheezing phenotypes. Information on genetic and environmental risk factors in early life was also obtained prospectively, and skin-prick testing to common allergens was performed at 4 years.

Results. Early-onset persistent wheezers (n = 125) had wheeze onset in the first 4 years, still present at age 10, whereas late-onset persistent wheezers (n = 81) had wheeze onset after age 4 years that was still present at 10 years. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified independent significance only for inherited factors (parental asthma, family history of rhinitis, eczema at 4 years, and atopic status at 4 years) in the development of late-onset persistent wheeze. However, low social class at birth, recurrent chest infections at 2 years, and parental smoking at 2 years plus inherited factors (eczema at 2 years; food allergy at 4 years; maternal asthma, sibling asthma, maternal urticaria, and atopic status at 4 years) demonstrated independent significance for early-onset persistent wheeze.

Conclusion. Inheritance seems to be of prime significance in the cause of persistent childhood wheeze. Environmental exposure in early life may combine with this tendency to produce an early onset of persistent wheeze. Absence of these environmental factors might delay but not prevent the onset of wheeze in children with atopic heredity.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 1 February 2004
Keywords: Age of Onset, Asthma/complications, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Eczema/complications, Environment, Female, Humans, Hypersensitivity/complications, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Logistic Models, Male, Phenotype, Prevalence, Respiratory Sounds/etiology, Rhinitis/complications, Risk Factors, Tobacco Smoke Pollution, United Kingdom/epidemiology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446444
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446444
ISSN: 0031-4005
PURE UUID: ff6f0bb2-c401-4d87-a2c9-b8adc218fe32
ORCID for Ramesh J. Kurukulaaratchy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1588-2400

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Feb 2021 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:54

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Sharon Matthews
Author: S. Hasan Arshad

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×