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Surface temperature condition monitoring methods for aerospace turbomachinery: exploring the use of ultrasonic guided waves

Surface temperature condition monitoring methods for aerospace turbomachinery: exploring the use of ultrasonic guided waves
Surface temperature condition monitoring methods for aerospace turbomachinery: exploring the use of ultrasonic guided waves
Turbine blades and nozzle guide vanes (NGVs) are operated at extreme temperatures in order to maximise thermal efficiency and power output of an engine. In this paper the suitability of existing temperature monitoring systems for turbine blades and nozzle guide vanes are reviewed. Both offline and online methods are presented and their advantages and disadvantages are examined. The use of offline systems is well established but their online equivalents are difficult to implement because limited access to components. There is the need for an improved sensor that is capable of monitoring temperature in real time with minimum interference to the operating conditions of the engine. Acoustic monitoring techniques are already used for a large number of structural health monitoring (SHM) applications and have the potential to be adapted for use in temperature monitoring for turbine blades and NGVs. High temperatures severely affect the response of ultrasonic transducers. However, waveguides and buffer rods can be used to distance transducers from extreme conditions, while piezoelectric materials such as YCOB and AlN have been developed for use at high temperatures. A new monitoring approach based on ultrasonic guided waves is introduced in this paper. The geometry of turbine blades and NGVs allows Lamb waves to propagate through their structure, and the presence of numerous cooling holes will produce acoustic reflections that can be utilised for temperature mapping. The dispersive nature of Lamb waves makes their analysis difficult; however, wave velocity in dispersive regions is particularly sensitive to changes in temperature and could be utilised for monitoring purposes. The proposed method has the potential to provide high resolution and accuracy, fast response times, and the ability to place sensors outside of the gas path. Further research is required to develop a monitoring system based on the use of guided waves in extreme environments.
Lamb waves, NGVs, aerospace, condition monitoring, guided waves, nozzle guide vanes, turbine blades
1361-6501
1-30
Yule, Lawrence
d95cece7-5fff-4bc6-bbf9-e276ab9425ac
Zaghari, Bahareh
a0537db6-0dce-49a2-8103-0f4599ab5f6a
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Hill, Martyn
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e
Yule, Lawrence
d95cece7-5fff-4bc6-bbf9-e276ab9425ac
Zaghari, Bahareh
a0537db6-0dce-49a2-8103-0f4599ab5f6a
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Hill, Martyn
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e

Yule, Lawrence, Zaghari, Bahareh, Harris, Nicholas and Hill, Martyn (2021) Surface temperature condition monitoring methods for aerospace turbomachinery: exploring the use of ultrasonic guided waves. Measurement Science and Technology, 32 (5), 1-30. (doi:10.1088/1361-6501/abda96).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Turbine blades and nozzle guide vanes (NGVs) are operated at extreme temperatures in order to maximise thermal efficiency and power output of an engine. In this paper the suitability of existing temperature monitoring systems for turbine blades and nozzle guide vanes are reviewed. Both offline and online methods are presented and their advantages and disadvantages are examined. The use of offline systems is well established but their online equivalents are difficult to implement because limited access to components. There is the need for an improved sensor that is capable of monitoring temperature in real time with minimum interference to the operating conditions of the engine. Acoustic monitoring techniques are already used for a large number of structural health monitoring (SHM) applications and have the potential to be adapted for use in temperature monitoring for turbine blades and NGVs. High temperatures severely affect the response of ultrasonic transducers. However, waveguides and buffer rods can be used to distance transducers from extreme conditions, while piezoelectric materials such as YCOB and AlN have been developed for use at high temperatures. A new monitoring approach based on ultrasonic guided waves is introduced in this paper. The geometry of turbine blades and NGVs allows Lamb waves to propagate through their structure, and the presence of numerous cooling holes will produce acoustic reflections that can be utilised for temperature mapping. The dispersive nature of Lamb waves makes their analysis difficult; however, wave velocity in dispersive regions is particularly sensitive to changes in temperature and could be utilised for monitoring purposes. The proposed method has the potential to provide high resolution and accuracy, fast response times, and the ability to place sensors outside of the gas path. Further research is required to develop a monitoring system based on the use of guided waves in extreme environments.

Text
Yule+et+al_2021_Meas._Sci._Technol._10.1088_1361-6501_abda96 - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 25 March 2022.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 January 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 March 2021
Published date: May 2021
Keywords: Lamb waves, NGVs, aerospace, condition monitoring, guided waves, nozzle guide vanes, turbine blades

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446452
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446452
ISSN: 1361-6501
PURE UUID: 98c07b10-06bb-428d-be98-2f33a47e17aa
ORCID for Lawrence Yule: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0324-6642
ORCID for Nicholas Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4122-2219
ORCID for Martyn Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6448-9448

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Feb 2021 17:33
Last modified: 17 Apr 2021 02:04

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