The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

The benefits of peer transparency in safe workplace operation post pandemic lockdown

The benefits of peer transparency in safe workplace operation post pandemic lockdown
The benefits of peer transparency in safe workplace operation post pandemic lockdown
The benefits of different levels of engagement with test, trace and isolate procedures are investigated for a pandemic in which there is little population immunity, in terms of productivity and public health. Simple mathematical modelling is used in the context of a single, relatively closed workplace such as a factory or back-office where, in normal operation, each worker has lengthy interactions with a fixed set of colleagues. A discrete-time SEIR model on a fixed interaction graph is simulated with parameters that are motivated by the recent COVID-19 pandemic in the UK during a post-peak phase, including a small risk of viral infection from outside the working environment. Two kinds of worker are assumed, transparents who regularly test, share their results with colleagues and isolate as soon as a contact tests positive for the disease, and opaques who do none of these. Moreover, the simulations are constructed as a ‘playable model’ in which the transparency level, disease parameters and mean interaction degree can be varied by the user. The model is also analysed in the continuum limit. All simulations point to the double benefit of transparency in both maximizing productivity and minimizing overall infection rates. Based on these findings, public policy implications are discussed for how to incentivise this mutually beneficial behaviour in different kinds of workplace, and simple recommendations are made.
COVID-19, mutualism, workplace
1742-5689
20200617
Wey, Arkady
025c9c3b-9c71-4abd-bfa0-c60f22408a2c
Champneys, Alan
766a8125-ff76-4a02-9cf8-ea81cc03974e
Dyson, Rosemary J.
45931dbe-60bf-4b97-8b2e-632f325ff737
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Barker, Mary
374310ad-d308-44af-b6da-515bf5d2d6d2
Wey, Arkady
025c9c3b-9c71-4abd-bfa0-c60f22408a2c
Champneys, Alan
766a8125-ff76-4a02-9cf8-ea81cc03974e
Dyson, Rosemary J.
45931dbe-60bf-4b97-8b2e-632f325ff737
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Barker, Mary
374310ad-d308-44af-b6da-515bf5d2d6d2

Wey, Arkady, Champneys, Alan, Dyson, Rosemary J., Alwan, Nisreen and Barker, Mary (2021) The benefits of peer transparency in safe workplace operation post pandemic lockdown. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 18 (174), 20200617. (doi:10.1098/rsif.2020.0617).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The benefits of different levels of engagement with test, trace and isolate procedures are investigated for a pandemic in which there is little population immunity, in terms of productivity and public health. Simple mathematical modelling is used in the context of a single, relatively closed workplace such as a factory or back-office where, in normal operation, each worker has lengthy interactions with a fixed set of colleagues. A discrete-time SEIR model on a fixed interaction graph is simulated with parameters that are motivated by the recent COVID-19 pandemic in the UK during a post-peak phase, including a small risk of viral infection from outside the working environment. Two kinds of worker are assumed, transparents who regularly test, share their results with colleagues and isolate as soon as a contact tests positive for the disease, and opaques who do none of these. Moreover, the simulations are constructed as a ‘playable model’ in which the transparency level, disease parameters and mean interaction degree can be varied by the user. The model is also analysed in the continuum limit. All simulations point to the double benefit of transparency in both maximizing productivity and minimizing overall infection rates. Based on these findings, public policy implications are discussed for how to incentivise this mutually beneficial behaviour in different kinds of workplace, and simple recommendations are made.

Text
peer transparency - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 January 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 January 2021
Published date: 27 January 2021
Additional Information: Copyright: This record is sourced from MEDLINE/PubMed, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
Keywords: COVID-19, mutualism, workplace

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446531
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446531
ISSN: 1742-5689
PURE UUID: ace1715f-1702-41e2-bfa2-b4f686c34647
ORCID for Nisreen Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463
ORCID for Mary Barker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2976-0217

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Feb 2021 17:31
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 02:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Arkady Wey
Author: Alan Champneys
Author: Rosemary J. Dyson
Author: Nisreen Alwan ORCID iD
Author: Mary Barker ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×