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Longitudinal analysis of the recovery of trunk control and upper extremity following stroke: An individual growth curve approach

Longitudinal analysis of the recovery of trunk control and upper extremity following stroke: An individual growth curve approach
Longitudinal analysis of the recovery of trunk control and upper extremity following stroke: An individual growth curve approach
Background and Purpose: Trunk control is thought to contribute to upper extremity function. It is unclear whether recovery of trunk control has an impact on the recovery of the upper extremity in people with stroke. This longitudinal study monitored the recovery of trunk control and upper extremity in the first 6 months following stroke.

Methods: Forty-five participants with stroke were assessed monthly for 6 months following stroke. Trunk control was assessed using the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS); upper extremity impairment and function were assessed with the Fugl-Meyer (FMA) and Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test (SWMFT) respectively. The SWMFT included the performance time (SWMFT-Time) and functional ability scale (SWMFT-FAS). The individual growth curve modeling was used to analyze the longitudinal data.

Results: The recovery curve of TIS, FMA, SWMFT-Time and SWMFT-FAS followed a quadratic trend, with the rate of recovery decreasing from the first to sixth month. As TIS score improved over time, FMA, SWMFT-Time and SWMFT-FAS improved in parallel with the TIS score. TIS at each time point was found to be a significant predictor of FMA, SWMFT-Time and SWMFT-FAS at 6 months post stroke.

Conclusion: Our work has provided, for the first time, substantial evidence that the pattern of recovery of trunk control is similar to that of the recovery of upper extremity following stroke. In addition, this study provides evidence on which to design a prospective study to evaluate whether improvement in trunk control early post-stroke results in better long-term upper extremity function.
Trunk control, neurorehabilitation, recovery trajectory, stroke, upper extremity
1074-9357
Wee, Seng Kwee
9a424121-debd-44c1-ad67-ee391e6da101
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Warner, Martin
f4dce73d-fb87-4f71-a3f0-078123aa040c
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Wee, Seng Kwee
9a424121-debd-44c1-ad67-ee391e6da101
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Warner, Martin
f4dce73d-fb87-4f71-a3f0-078123aa040c
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64

Wee, Seng Kwee, Hughes, Ann-Marie, Warner, Martin and Burridge, Jane (2021) Longitudinal analysis of the recovery of trunk control and upper extremity following stroke: An individual growth curve approach. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. (doi:10.1080/10749357.2021.1878333).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Trunk control is thought to contribute to upper extremity function. It is unclear whether recovery of trunk control has an impact on the recovery of the upper extremity in people with stroke. This longitudinal study monitored the recovery of trunk control and upper extremity in the first 6 months following stroke.

Methods: Forty-five participants with stroke were assessed monthly for 6 months following stroke. Trunk control was assessed using the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS); upper extremity impairment and function were assessed with the Fugl-Meyer (FMA) and Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test (SWMFT) respectively. The SWMFT included the performance time (SWMFT-Time) and functional ability scale (SWMFT-FAS). The individual growth curve modeling was used to analyze the longitudinal data.

Results: The recovery curve of TIS, FMA, SWMFT-Time and SWMFT-FAS followed a quadratic trend, with the rate of recovery decreasing from the first to sixth month. As TIS score improved over time, FMA, SWMFT-Time and SWMFT-FAS improved in parallel with the TIS score. TIS at each time point was found to be a significant predictor of FMA, SWMFT-Time and SWMFT-FAS at 6 months post stroke.

Conclusion: Our work has provided, for the first time, substantial evidence that the pattern of recovery of trunk control is similar to that of the recovery of upper extremity following stroke. In addition, this study provides evidence on which to design a prospective study to evaluate whether improvement in trunk control early post-stroke results in better long-term upper extremity function.

Text
Longitudinal Analysis of the Recovery of Trunk Control and Upper Extremity following Stroke An Individual Growth Curve Approach - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 February 2022.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 December 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 February 2021
Keywords: Trunk control, neurorehabilitation, recovery trajectory, stroke, upper extremity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446550
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446550
ISSN: 1074-9357
PURE UUID: 05254b28-54bd-4657-b66d-8a769f147a6c
ORCID for Ann-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Martin Warner: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1483-0561
ORCID for Jane Burridge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3497-6725

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Feb 2021 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:50

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Contributors

Author: Seng Kwee Wee
Author: Martin Warner ORCID iD
Author: Jane Burridge ORCID iD

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