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The 1999 super cyclone in Odisha, India: a systematic review of documented losses

The 1999 super cyclone in Odisha, India: a systematic review of documented losses
The 1999 super cyclone in Odisha, India: a systematic review of documented losses

Climate-related hazards accounted for over 90% of disasters over the past two decades and cause massive losses every year worldwide. In the face of the climate crisis, we are confronted with unprecedented challenges that require transformational change. The Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction set ambitious global goals and targets. Monitoring and reporting are fundamental towards their achievement. We are, thus, faced with an urgency to step up accountability efforts. India is one of the top ten countries by cumulative disaster losses, with the most intense recorded event being the 1999 Odisha super cyclone. Twenty years later, there is still no comprehensive documentation of the losses caused by the cyclone at the micro-level, nor an understanding of long-term post-disaster recovery patterns. To fill this gap, a systematic review has been conducted to gather evidence of recorded losses by type and their spatial distribution. Results show that satellite remote sensing has contributed to a finer and more localised estimation of losses compared to official records from 1999; that coastal and riverine districts are proven to be the worst impacted; and that we now have an understanding, albeit partial, of the non-physical impacts associated with the 1999 cyclone. This review provides the most comprehensive catalogue of documented losses induced by the 1999 super cyclone and is the best estimate of a baseline of impacts which can serve to investigate long-term recovery trends.

1999 super cyclone, Disaster losses, India, Odisha, Post-disaster recovery, Systematic review
2212-4209
1-10
Fanchiotti, Margherita
cb6af1c7-be9b-4ecc-a3db-2ddb0cd8059e
Dash, Jadu
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Tompkins, Emma L.
a6116704-7140-4e37-bea1-2cbf39b138c3
Hutton, Craig W.
9102617b-caf7-4538-9414-c29e72f5fe2e
Fanchiotti, Margherita
cb6af1c7-be9b-4ecc-a3db-2ddb0cd8059e
Dash, Jadu
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Tompkins, Emma L.
a6116704-7140-4e37-bea1-2cbf39b138c3
Hutton, Craig W.
9102617b-caf7-4538-9414-c29e72f5fe2e

Fanchiotti, Margherita, Dash, Jadu, Tompkins, Emma L. and Hutton, Craig W. (2020) The 1999 super cyclone in Odisha, India: a systematic review of documented losses. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 51, 1-10, [101790]. (doi:10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101790).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Climate-related hazards accounted for over 90% of disasters over the past two decades and cause massive losses every year worldwide. In the face of the climate crisis, we are confronted with unprecedented challenges that require transformational change. The Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction set ambitious global goals and targets. Monitoring and reporting are fundamental towards their achievement. We are, thus, faced with an urgency to step up accountability efforts. India is one of the top ten countries by cumulative disaster losses, with the most intense recorded event being the 1999 Odisha super cyclone. Twenty years later, there is still no comprehensive documentation of the losses caused by the cyclone at the micro-level, nor an understanding of long-term post-disaster recovery patterns. To fill this gap, a systematic review has been conducted to gather evidence of recorded losses by type and their spatial distribution. Results show that satellite remote sensing has contributed to a finer and more localised estimation of losses compared to official records from 1999; that coastal and riverine districts are proven to be the worst impacted; and that we now have an understanding, albeit partial, of the non-physical impacts associated with the 1999 cyclone. This review provides the most comprehensive catalogue of documented losses induced by the 1999 super cyclone and is the best estimate of a baseline of impacts which can serve to investigate long-term recovery trends.

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IJDRR_2020_375_R1-v2 - Author's Original
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 July 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 September 2020
Published date: 1 December 2020
Keywords: 1999 super cyclone, Disaster losses, India, Odisha, Post-disaster recovery, Systematic review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446820
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446820
ISSN: 2212-4209
PURE UUID: 7ca48253-4b8c-4a21-922d-2a39d71f21bd
ORCID for Jadu Dash: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5444-2109
ORCID for Craig W. Hutton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5896-756X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Feb 2021 17:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:01

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Contributors

Author: Margherita Fanchiotti
Author: Jadu Dash ORCID iD
Author: Craig W. Hutton ORCID iD

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