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The role of hydrogen in achieving Net Zero: a shipping perspective

The role of hydrogen in achieving Net Zero: a shipping perspective
The role of hydrogen in achieving Net Zero: a shipping perspective
HM Government’s “Clean Maritime Plan” (2019) targets zero emission shipping to be “commonplace” by 2050 and that all new ship orders by 2025 should be capable of delivering zero emission propulsion.
1 For these goals to be achieved, significant investment in alternative fuels is required.
2. The long-life span of large ships requires an early start to both retrofit of existing vessels as well as preparing the ground for a transition to new build zero carbon ship from 2025 onwards.
3. Large scale shipping is a challenging sector to decarbonise, primarily due to large energy demands coupled with limited onboard storage capacity. Alternative fuels are imperative to eliminate both greenhouse gas emissions and harmful pollutants that damage the health of seafarers and port communities.
4. Hydrogen is a viable candidate to provide emission-free propulsion and is cleaner and easier to produce without emissions than other alternatives being considered (such as ammonia or methanol). All combustion technologies are relatively inefficient and even those using zero carbon fuels (e.g., ammonia) lead to polluting emissions (e.g., NOx). Consequently, immediate research and innovation into electro-chemical approaches for powering large ships and other heavy-duty industrial uses are essential.
5. Our main policy recommendations are:  Invest in the research and development of hydrogen production, storage and transfer technologies for ships, ports and large industrial users.  Develop and introduce evidence-based safety regulations and protocols specific to alternative fuels and in particular hydrogen.  Increase subsidies for zero emission/zero carbon hydrogen production (such as water electrolysis).  Further research into the development of fuel cells or fuel cell/battery hybrid systems for ships and other major industrial off-grid applications.
hydrogen, shipping, fuel cells, Alternative fuels
University of Southampton
McKinlay, Charles John
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Turnock, Stephen
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Hudson, Dominic
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7
Wang, Yikun
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Wills, Richard
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Dbouk, Wassim
5027fe6d-3bbb-4ef0-9dbc-9e9650e73493
Teagle, Damon
396539c5-acbe-4dfa-bb9b-94af878fe286
McKinlay, Charles John
70c883f4-2e6c-4790-a120-ee6caf41cb57
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Hudson, Dominic
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7
Wang, Yikun
2729f2f1-36d7-4daa-8589-b61fcc99a313
Wills, Richard
60b7c98f-eced-4b11-aad9-fd2484e26c2c
Dbouk, Wassim
5027fe6d-3bbb-4ef0-9dbc-9e9650e73493
Teagle, Damon
396539c5-acbe-4dfa-bb9b-94af878fe286

McKinlay, Charles John, Turnock, Stephen, Hudson, Dominic, Wang, Yikun, Wills, Richard, Dbouk, Wassim and Teagle, Damon (2021) The role of hydrogen in achieving Net Zero: a shipping perspective University of Southampton (In Press)

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

HM Government’s “Clean Maritime Plan” (2019) targets zero emission shipping to be “commonplace” by 2050 and that all new ship orders by 2025 should be capable of delivering zero emission propulsion.
1 For these goals to be achieved, significant investment in alternative fuels is required.
2. The long-life span of large ships requires an early start to both retrofit of existing vessels as well as preparing the ground for a transition to new build zero carbon ship from 2025 onwards.
3. Large scale shipping is a challenging sector to decarbonise, primarily due to large energy demands coupled with limited onboard storage capacity. Alternative fuels are imperative to eliminate both greenhouse gas emissions and harmful pollutants that damage the health of seafarers and port communities.
4. Hydrogen is a viable candidate to provide emission-free propulsion and is cleaner and easier to produce without emissions than other alternatives being considered (such as ammonia or methanol). All combustion technologies are relatively inefficient and even those using zero carbon fuels (e.g., ammonia) lead to polluting emissions (e.g., NOx). Consequently, immediate research and innovation into electro-chemical approaches for powering large ships and other heavy-duty industrial uses are essential.
5. Our main policy recommendations are:  Invest in the research and development of hydrogen production, storage and transfer technologies for ships, ports and large industrial users.  Develop and introduce evidence-based safety regulations and protocols specific to alternative fuels and in particular hydrogen.  Increase subsidies for zero emission/zero carbon hydrogen production (such as water electrolysis).  Further research into the development of fuel cells or fuel cell/battery hybrid systems for ships and other major industrial off-grid applications.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: January 2021
Additional Information: Parliamentary inquiry
Keywords: hydrogen, shipping, fuel cells, Alternative fuels

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446826
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446826
PURE UUID: 7a17dcef-f3f1-44f2-9de4-9017b7e7de9e
ORCID for Charles John McKinlay: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8345-0271
ORCID for Stephen Turnock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6288-0400
ORCID for Dominic Hudson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2012-6255
ORCID for Yikun Wang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5619-7795
ORCID for Richard Wills: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4805-7589
ORCID for Damon Teagle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4416-8409

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Feb 2021 17:33
Last modified: 24 Feb 2021 02:54

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Contributors

Author: Charles John McKinlay ORCID iD
Author: Stephen Turnock ORCID iD
Author: Dominic Hudson ORCID iD
Author: Yikun Wang ORCID iD
Author: Richard Wills ORCID iD
Author: Wassim Dbouk
Author: Damon Teagle ORCID iD

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