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Feasibility and acceptability of a group Mindfulness intervention in a difficult asthma clinic

Feasibility and acceptability of a group Mindfulness intervention in a difficult asthma clinic
Feasibility and acceptability of a group Mindfulness intervention in a difficult asthma clinic

Objectives: Psychological dysfunction (such as anxiety) is common in people with difficult asthma and is associated with poor outcomes. Asthma guidelines increasingly emphasise the need to recognise and address co-morbidities, and it is plausible that appropriately targeted psychological interventions may be clinically and cost-effective. We hypothesised that mindfulness—facilitating adaptive responses to mental and emotional stress—would be acceptable and feasible for people with difficult asthma and undertook a pilot uncontrolled observational study. 

Methods: We offered a 4-week mindfulness intervention (four group sessions with 10–20 min of daily home practice) to adult patients attending difficult asthma clinics. Seventeen patients provided informed consent. Before and 3 months after the intervention, self-report questionnaires assessed asthma control, asthma-related quality of life, anxiety, depression, medication adherence and dysfunctional breathing symptoms. We conducted a focus group and follow-up telephone interviews with patients and collected routine clinic data including lung function.

Results: Three-month follow-up patients had lower self-reported anxiety scores, but there were no significant changes in other self-report measures including asthma control and asthma quality of life—though numerical trends generally indicated improvement. Intervention adherence and study retention varied. Thematic analysis exploring qualitative data found overarching themes highlighting the acceptability of mindfulness treatments, and identified some practical challenges to attending the course. 

Conclusions: Patients consenting to the mindfulness intervention found it acceptable. Self-report measures suggest potential for positive impact on their wellbeing. Patients successfully integrated mindfulness with their existing treatment, although practical barriers prevented some from attending the face-to-face group course.

Anxiety, Asthma, Feasibility, Mindfulness, Quality of life
1868-8527
1734-1746
Ainsworth, Ben
b02d78c3-aa8b-462d-a534-31f1bf164f81
Patel, Aarti
23f73140-7e5b-46ff-aca3-bb764c6d95ca
Eyles, Caroline
f8518cbb-669f-4cf6-bacb-4a174e385483
Davies, Gail Elaine
0e6496fd-0236-4d08-8adc-e1aa8a5ab485
Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Thomas, Mike
997c78e0-3849-4ce8-b1bc-86ebbdee3953
Ainsworth, Ben
b02d78c3-aa8b-462d-a534-31f1bf164f81
Patel, Aarti
23f73140-7e5b-46ff-aca3-bb764c6d95ca
Eyles, Caroline
f8518cbb-669f-4cf6-bacb-4a174e385483
Davies, Gail Elaine
0e6496fd-0236-4d08-8adc-e1aa8a5ab485
Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Thomas, Mike
997c78e0-3849-4ce8-b1bc-86ebbdee3953

Ainsworth, Ben, Patel, Aarti, Eyles, Caroline, Davies, Gail Elaine, Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh and Thomas, Mike (2020) Feasibility and acceptability of a group Mindfulness intervention in a difficult asthma clinic. Mindfulness, 11 (7), 1734-1746. (doi:10.1007/s12671-020-01391-w).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: Psychological dysfunction (such as anxiety) is common in people with difficult asthma and is associated with poor outcomes. Asthma guidelines increasingly emphasise the need to recognise and address co-morbidities, and it is plausible that appropriately targeted psychological interventions may be clinically and cost-effective. We hypothesised that mindfulness—facilitating adaptive responses to mental and emotional stress—would be acceptable and feasible for people with difficult asthma and undertook a pilot uncontrolled observational study. 

Methods: We offered a 4-week mindfulness intervention (four group sessions with 10–20 min of daily home practice) to adult patients attending difficult asthma clinics. Seventeen patients provided informed consent. Before and 3 months after the intervention, self-report questionnaires assessed asthma control, asthma-related quality of life, anxiety, depression, medication adherence and dysfunctional breathing symptoms. We conducted a focus group and follow-up telephone interviews with patients and collected routine clinic data including lung function.

Results: Three-month follow-up patients had lower self-reported anxiety scores, but there were no significant changes in other self-report measures including asthma control and asthma quality of life—though numerical trends generally indicated improvement. Intervention adherence and study retention varied. Thematic analysis exploring qualitative data found overarching themes highlighting the acceptability of mindfulness treatments, and identified some practical challenges to attending the course. 

Conclusions: Patients consenting to the mindfulness intervention found it acceptable. Self-report measures suggest potential for positive impact on their wellbeing. Patients successfully integrated mindfulness with their existing treatment, although practical barriers prevented some from attending the face-to-face group course.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 15 May 2020
Published date: 1 July 2020
Additional Information: Funding Information: The study was supported by a research project grant from the NIHR School of Primary Care (FR13:273). During the study BA was supported by an NIHR Post-doctoral Translational Fellowship from the NIHR School of Primary Care. The funding body had no input into design, analysis or interpretation of data, nor any input into the manuscript. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR, MRC, the NHS or the Department of Health. Publisher Copyright: © 2020, The Author(s). Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: Anxiety, Asthma, Feasibility, Mindfulness, Quality of life

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446857
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446857
ISSN: 1868-8527
PURE UUID: 2c76ee7a-c128-4740-a8ee-248583cd2fb0
ORCID for Ben Ainsworth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5098-1092
ORCID for Ramesh Kurukulaaratchy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1588-2400

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Feb 2021 17:32
Last modified: 03 Sep 2022 01:45

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Contributors

Author: Ben Ainsworth ORCID iD
Author: Aarti Patel
Author: Caroline Eyles
Author: Gail Elaine Davies
Author: Mike Thomas

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