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A study investigating the impact of a brief compassionate mind training on burnout and self-criticism in mental healthcare professionals

A study investigating the impact of a brief compassionate mind training on burnout and self-criticism in mental healthcare professionals
A study investigating the impact of a brief compassionate mind training on burnout and self-criticism in mental healthcare professionals
The first chapter is a systematic review and meta-analysis which aimed to explore the relationship between self-compassion and compassion towards others among healthcare professionals. The review was conducted in line with PRISMA guidelines and a multi-base search identified 11 studies that met the inclusion criteria for the review. Overall, a small positive association was found between self-compassion and compassion towards others. This review offers preliminary support that it may be possible for interventions to target self-compassion to enhance compassionate care among healthcare professionals. Although, due to the cross-sectional nature of the included studies, conclusions regarding a causal relationship is limited. Future research directions are discussed.

The second chapter is an empirical paper which aimed to reduce burnout and self-criticism among mental healthcare professionals using Compassionate Mind Training (CMT; Gilbert, 2000) to increase the three flows of compassion (to self, towards others and from others). In total, 205 mental healthcare professionals participated in Part A of the study, exploring baseline associations between the three flows of compassion, burnout and self-criticism. Cross-sectional analyses revealed significant negative associations between self-compassion and compassion from others and burnout, while compassion towards others negatively associated with client-related burnout only. Burnout positively associated with self-criticism, depression, anxiety and stress. Part B of the study consisted of a randomised controlled trial with 68 mental healthcare professionals. Analyses revealed openness to receiving compassion from others significantly increased and personal and work-related burnout significantly decreased post-intervention. These findings have important clinical implications for understanding and reducing burnout and self-criticism among mental healthcare professionals.

Keywords: Mental Healthcare Professionals, Burnout, Self-Criticism, Compassionate Mind Training, Flows of Compassion, Self-Compassion, Compassion towards Others, Compassion from Others.
University of Southampton
Atuk, Emel
39a6c977-eb13-4368-bf7e-f1da3defe356
Atuk, Emel
39a6c977-eb13-4368-bf7e-f1da3defe356
Ononaiye, Margarita
494d4a0d-a1f8-431a-8316-d97d5d0b600b
Brignell, Catherine
ec44ecae-8687-4bbb-bc81-8c2c8f27febd

Atuk, Emel (2020) A study investigating the impact of a brief compassionate mind training on burnout and self-criticism in mental healthcare professionals. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 204pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The first chapter is a systematic review and meta-analysis which aimed to explore the relationship between self-compassion and compassion towards others among healthcare professionals. The review was conducted in line with PRISMA guidelines and a multi-base search identified 11 studies that met the inclusion criteria for the review. Overall, a small positive association was found between self-compassion and compassion towards others. This review offers preliminary support that it may be possible for interventions to target self-compassion to enhance compassionate care among healthcare professionals. Although, due to the cross-sectional nature of the included studies, conclusions regarding a causal relationship is limited. Future research directions are discussed.

The second chapter is an empirical paper which aimed to reduce burnout and self-criticism among mental healthcare professionals using Compassionate Mind Training (CMT; Gilbert, 2000) to increase the three flows of compassion (to self, towards others and from others). In total, 205 mental healthcare professionals participated in Part A of the study, exploring baseline associations between the three flows of compassion, burnout and self-criticism. Cross-sectional analyses revealed significant negative associations between self-compassion and compassion from others and burnout, while compassion towards others negatively associated with client-related burnout only. Burnout positively associated with self-criticism, depression, anxiety and stress. Part B of the study consisted of a randomised controlled trial with 68 mental healthcare professionals. Analyses revealed openness to receiving compassion from others significantly increased and personal and work-related burnout significantly decreased post-intervention. These findings have important clinical implications for understanding and reducing burnout and self-criticism among mental healthcare professionals.

Keywords: Mental Healthcare Professionals, Burnout, Self-Criticism, Compassionate Mind Training, Flows of Compassion, Self-Compassion, Compassion towards Others, Compassion from Others.

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Published date: June 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446909
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446909
PURE UUID: 92927a6b-d742-4da4-bf61-0c3d71ca2bdf
ORCID for Catherine Brignell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7768-6272

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Feb 2021 17:30
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 02:54

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Contributors

Author: Emel Atuk
Thesis advisor: Margarita Ononaiye
Thesis advisor: Catherine Brignell ORCID iD

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