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Common heritage: Saving the environment for humankind or exploiting resources in the name of eco-imperialism?

Common heritage: Saving the environment for humankind or exploiting resources in the name of eco-imperialism?
Common heritage: Saving the environment for humankind or exploiting resources in the name of eco-imperialism?
Humankind is threatened by global environmental problems. Several scholars and states have therefore proposed the application of the 'common heritage of mankind' (CHM) principle to areas that fall within the territories of state. This may strengthen the international management of important resources, such as the Amazon. In this article the author critically examines the CHM principle and its application to global environmental resources. The relevance of the so-called 'common concern of mankind' also receives attention. The author approaches the issue from a critical Southern perspective in order to determine what the implications for developing countries are and concludes that the application of the CHM principle may benefit the rich to the detriment of the people of developing countries. The incorrect application of CHM does not take account of the history and purpose of this principle and that it may even destroy the permanent sovereignty of developing states and result in an 'expropriation' of resources of the developing world. The article concludes with alternative propo
0010-4051
273-293
Scholtz, Werner
4e8ad72b-807a-4aee-bee3-203f038a0a8c
Scholtz, Werner
4e8ad72b-807a-4aee-bee3-203f038a0a8c

Scholtz, Werner (2008) Common heritage: Saving the environment for humankind or exploiting resources in the name of eco-imperialism? Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa, 41 (2), 273-293.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Humankind is threatened by global environmental problems. Several scholars and states have therefore proposed the application of the 'common heritage of mankind' (CHM) principle to areas that fall within the territories of state. This may strengthen the international management of important resources, such as the Amazon. In this article the author critically examines the CHM principle and its application to global environmental resources. The relevance of the so-called 'common concern of mankind' also receives attention. The author approaches the issue from a critical Southern perspective in order to determine what the implications for developing countries are and concludes that the application of the CHM principle may benefit the rich to the detriment of the people of developing countries. The incorrect application of CHM does not take account of the history and purpose of this principle and that it may even destroy the permanent sovereignty of developing states and result in an 'expropriation' of resources of the developing world. The article concludes with alternative propo

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Published date: July 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446985
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446985
ISSN: 0010-4051
PURE UUID: e4741cc3-a14f-4d78-b577-a13cecdb41ba
ORCID for Werner Scholtz: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0959-0054

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Date deposited: 01 Mar 2021 17:32
Last modified: 29 Mar 2022 01:57

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