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Combination of the probiotics Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12 has limited effect on biomarkers of immunity and inflammation in older people resident in care homes: results from the Probiotics to Reduce Infections iN CarE home reSidentS (PRINCESS) randomised, controlled trial

Combination of the probiotics Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12 has limited effect on biomarkers of immunity and inflammation in older people resident in care homes: results from the Probiotics to Reduce Infections iN CarE home reSidentS (PRINCESS) randomised, controlled trial
Combination of the probiotics Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12 has limited effect on biomarkers of immunity and inflammation in older people resident in care homes: results from the Probiotics to Reduce Infections iN CarE home reSidentS (PRINCESS) randomised, controlled trial
Aging is associated with a decline in many components of the immune system (immunosenescence). Probiotics may improve the immune response in older people. The objective was to determine the effect of the combination of two probiotic organisms [Lacticaseibacillus (previously known as Lactobacillus) rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12 (BB-12)] on a range of immune biomarkers measured in the blood of older people resident in care homes in the UK. In a randomized controlled trial, older people [aged 67–97 (mean 86) years] resident in care homes received the combination of LGG+BB-12 (1.3–1.6 × 109 CFU per day) or placebo for up to 12 months. Full blood count, blood immune cell phenotypes, plasma immune mediator concentrations, phagocytosis, and blood culture responses to immune stimulation were all measured. Response to seasonal influenza vaccination was measured in a subset of participants. Paired samples (i.e., before and after intervention) were available for 30 participants per group. LGG and BB-12 were more likely to be present in feces in the probiotic group and were present at higher numbers. There was no significant effect of the probiotics on components of the full blood count, blood immune cell phenotypes, plasma immune mediator concentrations, phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes, and blood culture responses to immune stimulation. There was an indication that the probiotics improved the response to seasonal influenza vaccination with significantly (p = 0.04) higher seroconversion to the A/Michigan/2015 vaccine strain in the probiotic group than in the placebo group (47 vs. 15%).
aging, care home residents, immunity, immunosenescence, inflammageing, inflammation, probiotic
1664-3224
Castro Herrera, Vivian Maritza
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Fisk, Helena Lucy
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Wootton, Mandy
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Lown, Mark
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Owen-Jones, Eleri
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Lau, Mandy
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Lowe, Rachel
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Hood, Kerenza
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Gillespie, David
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Hobbs, Richard
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Little, Paul
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Butler, Christopher C.
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Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Castro Herrera, Vivian Maritza
ee06e5c1-815f-497f-9c67-47ead3772704
Fisk, Helena Lucy
38c7f1f0-5dfc-4f71-aa0f-ec4f0e5839f3
Wootton, Mandy
305ac6f7-9946-4996-a100-e692ed344760
Lown, Mark
4742d5f8-bcf3-4e0b-811c-920e7d010c9b
Owen-Jones, Eleri
0876d517-9f50-4608-b3f6-3fae4cae1ac5
Lau, Mandy
ebd931bb-22d7-481b-ba04-f831f4e45cb4
Lowe, Rachel
7e234964-ecae-46b1-8021-3a6aa908d785
Hood, Kerenza
b2ff0226-a6dc-4dac-bf76-a65501354a7d
Gillespie, David
e4a49f65-ac1e-45e6-8d72-d6cc1eaa4b7d
Hobbs, Richard
2a73b554-fadd-445c-a7f3-8e203a8cd9ce
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Butler, Christopher C.
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Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Calder, Philip
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Castro Herrera, Vivian Maritza, Fisk, Helena Lucy, Wootton, Mandy, Lown, Mark, Owen-Jones, Eleri, Lau, Mandy, Lowe, Rachel, Hood, Kerenza, Gillespie, David, Hobbs, Richard, Little, Paul, Butler, Christopher C., Miles, Elizabeth and Calder, Philip (2021) Combination of the probiotics Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12 has limited effect on biomarkers of immunity and inflammation in older people resident in care homes: results from the Probiotics to Reduce Infections iN CarE home reSidentS (PRINCESS) randomised, controlled trial. Frontiers in Immunology, 12, [643321]. (doi:10.3389/fimmu.2021.643321).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aging is associated with a decline in many components of the immune system (immunosenescence). Probiotics may improve the immune response in older people. The objective was to determine the effect of the combination of two probiotic organisms [Lacticaseibacillus (previously known as Lactobacillus) rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12 (BB-12)] on a range of immune biomarkers measured in the blood of older people resident in care homes in the UK. In a randomized controlled trial, older people [aged 67–97 (mean 86) years] resident in care homes received the combination of LGG+BB-12 (1.3–1.6 × 109 CFU per day) or placebo for up to 12 months. Full blood count, blood immune cell phenotypes, plasma immune mediator concentrations, phagocytosis, and blood culture responses to immune stimulation were all measured. Response to seasonal influenza vaccination was measured in a subset of participants. Paired samples (i.e., before and after intervention) were available for 30 participants per group. LGG and BB-12 were more likely to be present in feces in the probiotic group and were present at higher numbers. There was no significant effect of the probiotics on components of the full blood count, blood immune cell phenotypes, plasma immune mediator concentrations, phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes, and blood culture responses to immune stimulation. There was an indication that the probiotics improved the response to seasonal influenza vaccination with significantly (p = 0.04) higher seroconversion to the A/Michigan/2015 vaccine strain in the probiotic group than in the placebo group (47 vs. 15%).

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 February 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 March 2021
Keywords: aging, care home residents, immunity, immunosenescence, inflammageing, inflammation, probiotic

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447056
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447056
ISSN: 1664-3224
PURE UUID: 4f39b89f-10b9-4c85-858c-44ff4cac5068
ORCID for Mark Lown: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8309-568X
ORCID for Elizabeth Miles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0655
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Mar 2021 17:31
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 08:18

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Contributors

Author: Vivian Maritza Castro Herrera
Author: Helena Lucy Fisk
Author: Mandy Wootton
Author: Mark Lown ORCID iD
Author: Eleri Owen-Jones
Author: Mandy Lau
Author: Rachel Lowe
Author: Kerenza Hood
Author: David Gillespie
Author: Richard Hobbs
Author: Paul Little
Author: Christopher C. Butler
Author: Elizabeth Miles ORCID iD
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD

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