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“I remember/know/guess that I knew-it-all-along!”: Subjective experience versus objective measures of the knew-it-all-along effect

“I remember/know/guess that I knew-it-all-along!”: Subjective experience versus objective measures of the knew-it-all-along effect
“I remember/know/guess that I knew-it-all-along!”: Subjective experience versus objective measures of the knew-it-all-along effect
The knew-it-all-along (KIA) effect occurs when individuals report they previously knew something that they learned only recently. People often err when reporting the level of knowledge they had prior to feedback, but there is no research exploring the subjective experience of this effect. We incorporated a Remember/Just Know/Guess judgment in a traditional (Experiment 1A: rating scale) and a modified-traditional (Experiment 1B: 2-alternative forced-choice) KIA procedure. Experiments 2A, 2B, and 3 were similar in format to Experiments 1A and 1B, but the trivia stimuli were replaced with word puzzles, which were expected to be better suited to inducing a feeling of having known it all along because answers to trivia questions typically seem arbitrary whereas word puzzles often give rise to ah-ha experiences. A KIA effect was observed in all experiments, but an accompanying subjective feeling of having known it all along arose only with word puzzles.
0090-502X
Arnold, Michelle M.
201113ad-16ee-47e7-a526-e2171150d39d
Lindsay, D. Stephen
9c9a44b6-f958-4d24-a80e-881648357cd8
Arnold, Michelle M.
201113ad-16ee-47e7-a526-e2171150d39d
Lindsay, D. Stephen
9c9a44b6-f958-4d24-a80e-881648357cd8

Arnold, Michelle M. and Lindsay, D. Stephen (2007) “I remember/know/guess that I knew-it-all-along!”: Subjective experience versus objective measures of the knew-it-all-along effect. Memory & Cognition. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The knew-it-all-along (KIA) effect occurs when individuals report they previously knew something that they learned only recently. People often err when reporting the level of knowledge they had prior to feedback, but there is no research exploring the subjective experience of this effect. We incorporated a Remember/Just Know/Guess judgment in a traditional (Experiment 1A: rating scale) and a modified-traditional (Experiment 1B: 2-alternative forced-choice) KIA procedure. Experiments 2A, 2B, and 3 were similar in format to Experiments 1A and 1B, but the trivia stimuli were replaced with word puzzles, which were expected to be better suited to inducing a feeling of having known it all along because answers to trivia questions typically seem arbitrary whereas word puzzles often give rise to ah-ha experiences. A KIA effect was observed in all experiments, but an accompanying subjective feeling of having known it all along arose only with word puzzles.

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More information

Submitted date: 2007
Accepted/In Press date: 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44709
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44709
ISSN: 0090-502X
PURE UUID: 457a0511-643f-42ad-bdaa-bd5e9104e513

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 May 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:06

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