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Children’s views and experiences of treatment adherence and parent/child co-management in eczema: A qualitative study

Children’s views and experiences of treatment adherence and parent/child co-management in eczema: A qualitative study
Children’s views and experiences of treatment adherence and parent/child co-management in eczema: A qualitative study
Eczema affects one in five children and can have a substantial impact on quality of life. This qualitative study aimed to explore children’s views and experiences of eczema and what may affect treatment adherence from their perspective. We conducted semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with children with eczema aged 6–12 years from March to July 2018. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. We found that children do not typically view eczema as a long-term condition, and topical treatments (predominately emollients) were seen to provide effective symptom relief. Uncertainty around co-managing at home was expressed as children typically felt that parental reminders and assistance with applying different types of topical treatments were still needed. For some children, eczema can be difficult to manage at school due to a lack of convenient access and appropriate spaces to apply creams and psychosocial consequences such as attracting unwanted attention from peers and feeling self-conscious. Treatment adherence could be supported by reinforcing that eczema is a long-term episodic condition, providing clear information about regular emollient use, practical advice such as setting reminders to support co-management at home, and working with schools to facilitate topical treatment use when necessary.
children, co-management, eczema, qualitative, treatment adherence
Teasdale, Emma
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Sivyer, Katy
c9831d57-7d6b-4bb6-bb3c-770ea7f9b116
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Ghio, Daniela
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Roberts, Amanda
e6039287-3653-43e2-84ce-22b27db8640d
Lawton, Sandra
610566de-d907-4721-ac53-6ef72f9e708d
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc
Teasdale, Emma
f156de5f-e83e-40c0-aafa-0c95dd17aa80
Sivyer, Katy
c9831d57-7d6b-4bb6-bb3c-770ea7f9b116
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Ghio, Daniela
68e87380-d790-4f20-b24d-d3ac0ca5765d
Roberts, Amanda
e6039287-3653-43e2-84ce-22b27db8640d
Lawton, Sandra
610566de-d907-4721-ac53-6ef72f9e708d
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc

Teasdale, Emma, Sivyer, Katy, Muller, Ingrid, Ghio, Daniela, Roberts, Amanda, Lawton, Sandra and Santer, Miriam (2021) Children’s views and experiences of treatment adherence and parent/child co-management in eczema: A qualitative study. Children, 8 (2), [158]. (doi:10.3390/children8020158).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Eczema affects one in five children and can have a substantial impact on quality of life. This qualitative study aimed to explore children’s views and experiences of eczema and what may affect treatment adherence from their perspective. We conducted semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with children with eczema aged 6–12 years from March to July 2018. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. We found that children do not typically view eczema as a long-term condition, and topical treatments (predominately emollients) were seen to provide effective symptom relief. Uncertainty around co-managing at home was expressed as children typically felt that parental reminders and assistance with applying different types of topical treatments were still needed. For some children, eczema can be difficult to manage at school due to a lack of convenient access and appropriate spaces to apply creams and psychosocial consequences such as attracting unwanted attention from peers and feeling self-conscious. Treatment adherence could be supported by reinforcing that eczema is a long-term episodic condition, providing clear information about regular emollient use, practical advice such as setting reminders to support co-management at home, and working with schools to facilitate topical treatment use when necessary.

Text
children-1102530_accepted manuscript 16.02.21 - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 February 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 February 2021
Published date: 20 February 2021
Additional Information: Funding This study presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Programme Grants for Applied Research programme (grant ref No RP-PG-0216-20007). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.
Keywords: children, co-management, eczema, qualitative, treatment adherence

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447259
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447259
PURE UUID: 8d083810-f34d-45ef-a859-c6bd9f07f599
ORCID for Emma Teasdale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9147-193X
ORCID for Katy Sivyer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4349-0102
ORCID for Ingrid Muller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9341-6133
ORCID for Miriam Santer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7264-5260

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Mar 2021 17:34
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:09

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Contributors

Author: Emma Teasdale ORCID iD
Author: Katy Sivyer ORCID iD
Author: Ingrid Muller ORCID iD
Author: Daniela Ghio
Author: Amanda Roberts
Author: Sandra Lawton
Author: Miriam Santer ORCID iD

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