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Hyperloop - Prediction of social & physiological costs

Hyperloop - Prediction of social & physiological costs
Hyperloop - Prediction of social & physiological costs
Background: Hyperloop is a new technological concept for a very fast magnetic levitation train that would travel through soft vacuum tubes and could achieve a speed of up to 1,200 km/h. As a new transportation system, it might bring some challenges related to human factors that should be tested and considered when designing and propagating Hyperloop.

Aim: This paper used a survey and literature review to identify potential physiological and social challenges. Some of these challenges might be high speed, high acceleration /deceleration, large magnetic forces, safety concerns, air pressure, motion sickness and cost as potential human-related challenges.

Methods: In this case, the method of literature review aimed to evaluate the potential physiological effect of these factors on the passengers. It investigated physiological consequences of very high speed, high acceleration/deceleration, and a high magnetic field, as well as human factors of the Maglev trains. The survey was distributed electronically by sending the link to different people from all over the world, which would let them do it through the Isurvey’s website.

Results: Regarding the results of the survey, 80% of the participants were male and the highest percentage in terms of age was 46% for 25-34 years old, as well as full-time education was having the highest percentage in terms of occupation of 49%. In terms of sensitivity, only 32 participants and 16 participants were sensitive to the Hyperloop’s high rates of acceleration/deceleration and electromagnetic fields, respectively. The literature identified high acceleration/deceleration, high speed and high magnetic field as potential risks or sources of discomfort for the passengers.

Conclusion: To the knowledge of the authors, it is the first attempt to identify social and physiological challenges related to the Hyperloop trains concept. It is aimed to inform the development and policies to achieve the safest and most comfortable transportation form.
Hyperloop, very fast trains, magnetic levitation trains, human factors, physiology, social cost, acceleration, deceleration, magnetic field, motion sickness, very high speed, g force
43-59
Almujibah, Hamad Raja
c115c81c-e109-404e-823f-54697ed32497
Kaduk, Sylwia Izabela
4faa8ddf-42f3-4f14-a5b6-a21e30eff0bd
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Almujibah, Hamad Raja
c115c81c-e109-404e-823f-54697ed32497
Kaduk, Sylwia Izabela
4faa8ddf-42f3-4f14-a5b6-a21e30eff0bd
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b

Almujibah, Hamad Raja, Kaduk, Sylwia Izabela and Preston, John (2020) Hyperloop - Prediction of social & physiological costs. Transportation Systems and Technology, 6 (3), 43-59. (doi:10.17816/transsyst20206343-59 Cite item).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Hyperloop is a new technological concept for a very fast magnetic levitation train that would travel through soft vacuum tubes and could achieve a speed of up to 1,200 km/h. As a new transportation system, it might bring some challenges related to human factors that should be tested and considered when designing and propagating Hyperloop.

Aim: This paper used a survey and literature review to identify potential physiological and social challenges. Some of these challenges might be high speed, high acceleration /deceleration, large magnetic forces, safety concerns, air pressure, motion sickness and cost as potential human-related challenges.

Methods: In this case, the method of literature review aimed to evaluate the potential physiological effect of these factors on the passengers. It investigated physiological consequences of very high speed, high acceleration/deceleration, and a high magnetic field, as well as human factors of the Maglev trains. The survey was distributed electronically by sending the link to different people from all over the world, which would let them do it through the Isurvey’s website.

Results: Regarding the results of the survey, 80% of the participants were male and the highest percentage in terms of age was 46% for 25-34 years old, as well as full-time education was having the highest percentage in terms of occupation of 49%. In terms of sensitivity, only 32 participants and 16 participants were sensitive to the Hyperloop’s high rates of acceleration/deceleration and electromagnetic fields, respectively. The literature identified high acceleration/deceleration, high speed and high magnetic field as potential risks or sources of discomfort for the passengers.

Conclusion: To the knowledge of the authors, it is the first attempt to identify social and physiological challenges related to the Hyperloop trains concept. It is aimed to inform the development and policies to achieve the safest and most comfortable transportation form.

Text
Hyperloop- Hamad Sylwia version 20.05.2020 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 September 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 September 2020
Keywords: Hyperloop, very fast trains, magnetic levitation trains, human factors, physiology, social cost, acceleration, deceleration, magnetic field, motion sickness, very high speed, g force

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447262
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447262
PURE UUID: f45972a2-65be-4ee5-988b-d03f5a63e6cd
ORCID for John Preston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6866-049X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Mar 2021 17:34
Last modified: 06 Mar 2021 02:39

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Contributors

Author: Sylwia Izabela Kaduk
Author: John Preston ORCID iD

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