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Fusobacterium species infections: Clinical spectrum and outcomes at a district general hospital

Fusobacterium species infections: Clinical spectrum and outcomes at a district general hospital
Fusobacterium species infections: Clinical spectrum and outcomes at a district general hospital
Purpose: Fusobacterium species infections are rare. Recently, however, this potentially deadly pathogen has been attracting interest, and efforts are being made to characterise its epidemiology and clinical spectrum of disease. The aim of our study is to provide further evidence towards this cause, in what is, to date, the largest study of its kind from the UK.

Method: A 22-year, retrospective, descriptive study was performed at Royal Hampshire County Hospital. An electronic database was used to identify patients with microbiologically confirmed infection with Fusobacterium, and clinical records were examined to provide further information on the presentation, source, treatment and outcome.

Results: Fusobacterium species infections were identified in 18 patients during the study period, which is an incidence of 0.76 cases/100,000/year. The overall death rate was 29 %. Half of these patients had Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and were a predominantly young, fit and uniquely male population who had excellent outcomes. Among the remaining patients with Fusobacterium species infections, 22 % had infection with F. varium and 11 % with F. nucleatum. These patients were an older cohort who tended to have co-morbidities and unsurprisingly worse outcomes. We identified a number of Fusobacterium bacteraemias likely to have resulted from pressure ulcers, a presentation that has been rarely reported. Interestingly, we also identified a case of neonatal F. nucleatum bacteraemia that was not associated with premature nor stillborn birth.

Conclusion: As work continues to depict the spectrum of disease caused by this enigmatic bacterium, it is hoped that improved clinical suspicion will result in better outcomes and management.
Anaerobe, Fusobacterium, Lemierre's disease, Necrobacillosis, Sepsis
0300-8126
363-370
Pett, E.
f8ea5e1c-2470-4d36-945f-0cb633457278
Saeed, K.
87cb67e5-71e8-4759-bf23-2ea00ebd8b39
Dryden, M.
a6c300f9-5c26-4884-980b-c098b0688ab1
Pett, E.
f8ea5e1c-2470-4d36-945f-0cb633457278
Saeed, K.
87cb67e5-71e8-4759-bf23-2ea00ebd8b39
Dryden, M.
a6c300f9-5c26-4884-980b-c098b0688ab1

Pett, E., Saeed, K. and Dryden, M. (2014) Fusobacterium species infections: Clinical spectrum and outcomes at a district general hospital. Infection, 42 (2), 363-370. (doi:10.1007/s15010-013-0564-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: Fusobacterium species infections are rare. Recently, however, this potentially deadly pathogen has been attracting interest, and efforts are being made to characterise its epidemiology and clinical spectrum of disease. The aim of our study is to provide further evidence towards this cause, in what is, to date, the largest study of its kind from the UK.

Method: A 22-year, retrospective, descriptive study was performed at Royal Hampshire County Hospital. An electronic database was used to identify patients with microbiologically confirmed infection with Fusobacterium, and clinical records were examined to provide further information on the presentation, source, treatment and outcome.

Results: Fusobacterium species infections were identified in 18 patients during the study period, which is an incidence of 0.76 cases/100,000/year. The overall death rate was 29 %. Half of these patients had Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and were a predominantly young, fit and uniquely male population who had excellent outcomes. Among the remaining patients with Fusobacterium species infections, 22 % had infection with F. varium and 11 % with F. nucleatum. These patients were an older cohort who tended to have co-morbidities and unsurprisingly worse outcomes. We identified a number of Fusobacterium bacteraemias likely to have resulted from pressure ulcers, a presentation that has been rarely reported. Interestingly, we also identified a case of neonatal F. nucleatum bacteraemia that was not associated with premature nor stillborn birth.

Conclusion: As work continues to depict the spectrum of disease caused by this enigmatic bacterium, it is hoped that improved clinical suspicion will result in better outcomes and management.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 December 2013
Published date: April 2014
Additional Information: Copyright: Copyright 2014 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: Anaerobe, Fusobacterium, Lemierre's disease, Necrobacillosis, Sepsis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447323
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447323
ISSN: 0300-8126
PURE UUID: 602d1b1b-d77e-4fb4-8cb7-d84b63d7251d
ORCID for K. Saeed: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0123-0302

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Mar 2021 17:32
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 02:24

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Contributors

Author: E. Pett
Author: K. Saeed ORCID iD
Author: M. Dryden

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