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Using antimicrobial surgihoney to prevent caesarean wound infection

Using antimicrobial surgihoney to prevent caesarean wound infection
Using antimicrobial surgihoney to prevent caesarean wound infection

Caesarean section (CS) wound infection rates are unacceptably high; around 10% according to figures from the Health Protection Agency (2012). This service evaluation assessed the effects of Surgihoney on surgical site infection rates in women undergoing caesarean section. All women presenting for CS were offered Surgihoney as a single application wound dressing at the end of the procedure. All women were followed up and examined for surgical site infection for 30 days after CS. A single application of Surgihoney dressing reduced surgical site infection (SSI) by 60.33% from a rate of 5.42% (n=590) to 2.15% (n=186) (p-value=0.042). The potential saving to the NHS of using Surgihoney as a single application achieving this level of wound infection reduction is considerable. Surgihoney offers a simple, costeffective intervention to reduce SSI in women undergoing CS. It is applicable to practice in all health economies and could potentially save considerable surgical infective morbidity in patients undergoing surgical delivery.

0969-4900
111-115
Dryden, Matthew
a6c300f9-5c26-4884-980b-c098b0688ab1
Goddard, Clare
388e3614-63fc-45b2-82f7-e25445e196cf
Madadi, Aznvik
f285a5de-fa49-478c-a4c3-317c10759340
Heard, Michael
07e10150-a1bb-42c0-8213-ab85e3d9c2a3
Saeed, Kordo
87cb67e5-71e8-4759-bf23-2ea00ebd8b39
Cooke, Jonathan
66a01b74-cc14-4831-a7cb-231e692e8a70
Dryden, Matthew
a6c300f9-5c26-4884-980b-c098b0688ab1
Goddard, Clare
388e3614-63fc-45b2-82f7-e25445e196cf
Madadi, Aznvik
f285a5de-fa49-478c-a4c3-317c10759340
Heard, Michael
07e10150-a1bb-42c0-8213-ab85e3d9c2a3
Saeed, Kordo
87cb67e5-71e8-4759-bf23-2ea00ebd8b39
Cooke, Jonathan
66a01b74-cc14-4831-a7cb-231e692e8a70

Dryden, Matthew, Goddard, Clare, Madadi, Aznvik, Heard, Michael, Saeed, Kordo and Cooke, Jonathan (2014) Using antimicrobial surgihoney to prevent caesarean wound infection. British Journal of Midwifery, 22 (2), 111-115. (doi:10.12968/bjom.2014.22.2.111).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Caesarean section (CS) wound infection rates are unacceptably high; around 10% according to figures from the Health Protection Agency (2012). This service evaluation assessed the effects of Surgihoney on surgical site infection rates in women undergoing caesarean section. All women presenting for CS were offered Surgihoney as a single application wound dressing at the end of the procedure. All women were followed up and examined for surgical site infection for 30 days after CS. A single application of Surgihoney dressing reduced surgical site infection (SSI) by 60.33% from a rate of 5.42% (n=590) to 2.15% (n=186) (p-value=0.042). The potential saving to the NHS of using Surgihoney as a single application achieving this level of wound infection reduction is considerable. Surgihoney offers a simple, costeffective intervention to reduce SSI in women undergoing CS. It is applicable to practice in all health economies and could potentially save considerable surgical infective morbidity in patients undergoing surgical delivery.

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More information

Published date: February 2014
Additional Information: Copyright: Copyright 2014 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447340
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447340
ISSN: 0969-4900
PURE UUID: 732d4f80-6ed5-4875-8385-911f10f8f758
ORCID for Kordo Saeed: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0123-0302

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Date deposited: 09 Mar 2021 17:33
Last modified: 10 Jun 2022 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Matthew Dryden
Author: Clare Goddard
Author: Aznvik Madadi
Author: Michael Heard
Author: Kordo Saeed ORCID iD
Author: Jonathan Cooke

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