The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Imagining Roman ports. the contribution of iconography to the reconstruction of Roman Mediterranean portscapes of the Imperial Period

Imagining Roman ports. the contribution of iconography to the reconstruction of Roman Mediterranean portscapes of the Imperial Period
Imagining Roman ports. the contribution of iconography to the reconstruction of Roman Mediterranean portscapes of the Imperial Period
Under the Roman Empire, harbours played an important role for the image of the city. They were more than utilitarian constructions. The buildings and monuments were organised within the space of the port in a programmatic way that made up a genuine urban landscape that I have described as a “portscape”. This term, derived from Zanker’s townscape concept, is understood as the urban aspect, layout and design of Roman ports but also as the lived environment with its societies reflected by its cultural characteristics. Despite recent excavations conducted at Roman ports, our knowledge of portscapes under the Roman Empire is very unclear and the reality of port monuments remains poorly understood. Most known ancient Mediterranean ports are not well preserved, and often only preserved archaeologically at the level of their foundations. While archaeologists are able to reconstruct a plan, understanding ports three dimensionally is at best a challenge. What did Roman ports really look like?

Due to the lack of ancient sources relating to Roman ports, using iconography could be useful. This research aims to demonstrate that port depictions, quite abundant during the Imperial period and decorating various type of artistic media (coins, ceramics, mosaics, paintings, gemstones etc.), can make an important contribution for learning more about ports as they are the only source of information that allows us to understand volumetrically, the architecture of ports that no longer survives archaeologically.
University of Southampton
Mailleur, Stephanie
3e464460-81cf-4041-956f-cdcd97808180
Mailleur, Stephanie
3e464460-81cf-4041-956f-cdcd97808180
Keay, Simon
52b4cdfd-fc5e-4fa0-bd3e-8dd896624f41
Moser, Stephanie
af3009ce-a7c4-4550-a180-7e1987b7deed

Mailleur, Stephanie (2020) Imagining Roman ports. the contribution of iconography to the reconstruction of Roman Mediterranean portscapes of the Imperial Period. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 249pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Under the Roman Empire, harbours played an important role for the image of the city. They were more than utilitarian constructions. The buildings and monuments were organised within the space of the port in a programmatic way that made up a genuine urban landscape that I have described as a “portscape”. This term, derived from Zanker’s townscape concept, is understood as the urban aspect, layout and design of Roman ports but also as the lived environment with its societies reflected by its cultural characteristics. Despite recent excavations conducted at Roman ports, our knowledge of portscapes under the Roman Empire is very unclear and the reality of port monuments remains poorly understood. Most known ancient Mediterranean ports are not well preserved, and often only preserved archaeologically at the level of their foundations. While archaeologists are able to reconstruct a plan, understanding ports three dimensionally is at best a challenge. What did Roman ports really look like?

Due to the lack of ancient sources relating to Roman ports, using iconography could be useful. This research aims to demonstrate that port depictions, quite abundant during the Imperial period and decorating various type of artistic media (coins, ceramics, mosaics, paintings, gemstones etc.), can make an important contribution for learning more about ports as they are the only source of information that allows us to understand volumetrically, the architecture of ports that no longer survives archaeologically.

Text
PhD Thesis_Stephanie Mailleur - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (10MB)
Text
Permission to deposit thesis form_Stephanie Mailleur
Restricted to Repository staff only

More information

Published date: January 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447380
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447380
PURE UUID: 9dca8400-0631-4af0-908c-3c38e850a07a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Mar 2021 17:38
Last modified: 10 Mar 2021 17:38

Export record

Contributors

Author: Stephanie Mailleur
Thesis advisor: Simon Keay
Thesis advisor: Stephanie Moser

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×