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Epistemic injustice and hegemonic ordeal in management and organization studies: Advancing black scholarship

Epistemic injustice and hegemonic ordeal in management and organization studies: Advancing black scholarship
Epistemic injustice and hegemonic ordeal in management and organization studies: Advancing black scholarship
Why do the majority of (white) academics within management and organization studies (MOS) endorse discourses of equality, diversity and inclusion on the one hand yet ignore the epistemic injustice suffered by black scholars on the other? We demonstrate how white supremacy within a historically racist academia marginalizes non-white bodies from knowledge production and dissemination by embedding epistemic injustice in MOS, and diminishing their utility globally. To expose the multifaceted harm caused by white supremacy, we reflect on black scholars’ experiences of epistemic injustice, conceptualizing their work (i.e. black scholarship) as underpinned by epistemic struggle and epistemic
survival. We conceptualize epistemic struggle as striving to produce and disseminate knowledge in the face of difficulties and resistance generated by structural and agential powers. Epistemic survival denotes the sustained presence of black scholarship through compromise, collusion and radicalism. To this end, we propose collective intellectual activism based on cross-racial coalitions to eliminate epistemic injustice and locate black scholarship at the center of MOS.
0018-7267
Muzanenhamo, Penelope
f5116ab0-34bb-4bc7-b0bb-1668ad54e8e6
Chowdhury, Rashedur
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Muzanenhamo, Penelope
f5116ab0-34bb-4bc7-b0bb-1668ad54e8e6
Chowdhury, Rashedur
d9c0a66a-90d6-46e3-8855-945863126c30

Muzanenhamo, Penelope and Chowdhury, Rashedur (2021) Epistemic injustice and hegemonic ordeal in management and organization studies: Advancing black scholarship. Human Relations. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Why do the majority of (white) academics within management and organization studies (MOS) endorse discourses of equality, diversity and inclusion on the one hand yet ignore the epistemic injustice suffered by black scholars on the other? We demonstrate how white supremacy within a historically racist academia marginalizes non-white bodies from knowledge production and dissemination by embedding epistemic injustice in MOS, and diminishing their utility globally. To expose the multifaceted harm caused by white supremacy, we reflect on black scholars’ experiences of epistemic injustice, conceptualizing their work (i.e. black scholarship) as underpinned by epistemic struggle and epistemic
survival. We conceptualize epistemic struggle as striving to produce and disseminate knowledge in the face of difficulties and resistance generated by structural and agential powers. Epistemic survival denotes the sustained presence of black scholarship through compromise, collusion and radicalism. To this end, we propose collective intellectual activism based on cross-racial coalitions to eliminate epistemic injustice and locate black scholarship at the center of MOS.

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Epistemic Injustice and Hegemonic Ordeal in Management and Organization Studies - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 9 March 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447484
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447484
ISSN: 0018-7267
PURE UUID: 2ac454b5-67d4-4bbf-b11f-52ba7b757338
ORCID for Rashedur Chowdhury: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5118-8344

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Date deposited: 12 Mar 2021 17:32
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 03:31

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Contributors

Author: Penelope Muzanenhamo

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