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Clinical phenotypes: Children

Clinical phenotypes: Children
Clinical phenotypes: Children

Severe asthma is a complex syndrome with heterogeneous clinical features that change with development. Pre-school children manifest a phenotype characterised by repeated episodes of multitrigger wheeze and sensitisation to environmental allergens. School-age children may manifest a phenotype of severe wheeze and airflow limitation that can persist and potentially culminate in COPD. School-age children with severe asthma can be sorted by cluster analysis into phenotypes differentiated by young age of onset, sensitisation to multiple allergens and by the presence or absence of airflow limitation. Pre-school children are more likely to transition from one phenotype to another compared to school-age children. Unlike “neutrophilic” asthma in adults, lung neutrophilia in childhood asthma is highly informed by microbial pathogens and has fewer morbid features. Future phenotypic classification methods will evolve to recognition of endotypes, defined by common molecular patterns of inflammation, and will guide specific therapies.

2312-508X
64-81
European Respiratory Society
Teague, W. Gerald
9fc0909a-b47d-47b5-9767-ffc61e2e7673
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Chung, K Fan
Israel, Elliot
Gibson, Peter G.
Hurst, John R.
Teague, W. Gerald
9fc0909a-b47d-47b5-9767-ffc61e2e7673
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Chung, K Fan
Israel, Elliot
Gibson, Peter G.
Hurst, John R.

Teague, W. Gerald and Roberts, Graham (2019) Clinical phenotypes: Children. In, Chung, K Fan, Israel, Elliot, Gibson, Peter G. and Hurst, John R. (eds.) Severe Asthma. (ERS Monograph) Sheffield. European Respiratory Society, pp. 64-81. (doi:10.1183/2312508X.10023018).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Severe asthma is a complex syndrome with heterogeneous clinical features that change with development. Pre-school children manifest a phenotype characterised by repeated episodes of multitrigger wheeze and sensitisation to environmental allergens. School-age children may manifest a phenotype of severe wheeze and airflow limitation that can persist and potentially culminate in COPD. School-age children with severe asthma can be sorted by cluster analysis into phenotypes differentiated by young age of onset, sensitisation to multiple allergens and by the presence or absence of airflow limitation. Pre-school children are more likely to transition from one phenotype to another compared to school-age children. Unlike “neutrophilic” asthma in adults, lung neutrophilia in childhood asthma is highly informed by microbial pathogens and has fewer morbid features. Future phenotypic classification methods will evolve to recognition of endotypes, defined by common molecular patterns of inflammation, and will guide specific therapies.

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More information

Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447658
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447658
ISSN: 2312-508X
PURE UUID: f43a2e2b-cdd0-41d3-acfa-18da04945cfb
ORCID for Graham Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Mar 2021 17:39
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:19

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Contributors

Author: W. Gerald Teague
Author: Graham Roberts ORCID iD
Editor: K Fan Chung
Editor: Elliot Israel
Editor: Peter G. Gibson
Editor: John R. Hurst

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