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Association between flavonoid intake and risk of hypertension in two cohorts of Australian women: a longitudinal study

Association between flavonoid intake and risk of hypertension in two cohorts of Australian women: a longitudinal study
Association between flavonoid intake and risk of hypertension in two cohorts of Australian women: a longitudinal study

PURPOSE: Epidemiological evidence suggests higher dietary flavonoid intake is associated with lower risk of several chronic diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association between intake of flavonoids and their subclasses, and incidence of hypertension among Australian women in two age cohorts.

METHODS: This population-based study included 6599 middle-aged (52.5 ± 1.5 years) and 6099 reproductive-aged (27.5 ± 1.5 years) women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Food frequency questionnaires were used to quantify intake of flavonoids by cross-referencing with the Phenol-Explorer food composition database. Generalised Estimating Equation analyses investigated associations with incident hypertension, adjusting for demographic and dietary variables and hypertension risk factors.

RESULTS: There were 1645 cases (24.9%) of hypertension during 15 years follow-up in the middle-aged cohort and 336 cases (5.5%) during 12 years follow-up in the reproductive-aged cohort. Higher intakes of flavones [adjusted relative risk (ARR) for quintile 5 vs. 1: 0.82, 95% CI 0.70-0.97], isoflavones (0.86, 0.75-0.99) and flavanones (0.83, 0.69-1.00) were associated with a lower risk of hypertension in the middle-aged cohort. In the reproductive-aged cohort, higher intakes of flavanols (0.70, 0.49-0.99) were associated with a lower risk of hypertension. Key foods that provided these flavonoids were oranges, orange juice, apples, red wine and soy milk.

CONCLUSION: Higher intakes of total flavonoids and subclasses were associated with a lower risk of hypertension in Australian women. These findings can be used in nutrition messaging and policies for improved cardiovascular health of women.

1436-6207
do Rosario, Vinicius A
d2278b9d-7381-47de-a900-d73387100e30
Schoenaker, Danielle A J M
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Kent, Katherine
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Weston-Green, Katrina
b4cfa4a0-dfdd-4850-94ef-c49c32b57f91
Charlton, Karen
e116858c-35d9-440c-a075-95a343cad09f
do Rosario, Vinicius A
d2278b9d-7381-47de-a900-d73387100e30
Schoenaker, Danielle A J M
84b96b87-4070-45a5-9777-5a1e4e45e818
Kent, Katherine
5fa82485-4fc1-4ff4-8fc1-5f1d196bf237
Weston-Green, Katrina
b4cfa4a0-dfdd-4850-94ef-c49c32b57f91
Charlton, Karen
e116858c-35d9-440c-a075-95a343cad09f

do Rosario, Vinicius A, Schoenaker, Danielle A J M, Kent, Katherine, Weston-Green, Katrina and Charlton, Karen (2020) Association between flavonoid intake and risk of hypertension in two cohorts of Australian women: a longitudinal study. European Journal of Nutrition. (doi:10.1007/s00394-020-02424-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

PURPOSE: Epidemiological evidence suggests higher dietary flavonoid intake is associated with lower risk of several chronic diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association between intake of flavonoids and their subclasses, and incidence of hypertension among Australian women in two age cohorts.

METHODS: This population-based study included 6599 middle-aged (52.5 ± 1.5 years) and 6099 reproductive-aged (27.5 ± 1.5 years) women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Food frequency questionnaires were used to quantify intake of flavonoids by cross-referencing with the Phenol-Explorer food composition database. Generalised Estimating Equation analyses investigated associations with incident hypertension, adjusting for demographic and dietary variables and hypertension risk factors.

RESULTS: There were 1645 cases (24.9%) of hypertension during 15 years follow-up in the middle-aged cohort and 336 cases (5.5%) during 12 years follow-up in the reproductive-aged cohort. Higher intakes of flavones [adjusted relative risk (ARR) for quintile 5 vs. 1: 0.82, 95% CI 0.70-0.97], isoflavones (0.86, 0.75-0.99) and flavanones (0.83, 0.69-1.00) were associated with a lower risk of hypertension in the middle-aged cohort. In the reproductive-aged cohort, higher intakes of flavanols (0.70, 0.49-0.99) were associated with a lower risk of hypertension. Key foods that provided these flavonoids were oranges, orange juice, apples, red wine and soy milk.

CONCLUSION: Higher intakes of total flavonoids and subclasses were associated with a lower risk of hypertension in Australian women. These findings can be used in nutrition messaging and policies for improved cardiovascular health of women.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 October 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 November 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447669
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447669
ISSN: 1436-6207
PURE UUID: 7b8b09e6-958d-4ed0-87c1-858084421e3d
ORCID for Danielle A J M Schoenaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7652-990X

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Date deposited: 18 Mar 2021 17:34
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:10

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Contributors

Author: Vinicius A do Rosario
Author: Katherine Kent
Author: Katrina Weston-Green
Author: Karen Charlton

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