The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The effects of LED light bulb installation on electricity demand in UK households: results of a large n randomised control trial

The effects of LED light bulb installation on electricity demand in UK households: results of a large n randomised control trial
The effects of LED light bulb installation on electricity demand in UK households: results of a large n randomised control trial
Energy efficiency is a critical component in any strategy to reduce the need for expensive GHG-intensive peak demand generation in the UK and elsewhere and reduce the need for capital intensive local distribution network reinforcement. Lighting currently consumes approximately 15% of total electricity consumption in the UK ranging from 6 to 15% for electrically heated and non-electrically heated households respectively and 14% of peak winter load . Increasing lighting efficiency could therefore offer substantial sustained residential demand reduction coinciding with known patterns of (especially) winter peak demand. In this paper we report analysis of a large-scale UK randomised-controlled trial which tested the effect of LED lightbulb installation on temporal electricity consumption in winter and estimated the consumer and network benefits of doing so.
Anderson, Ben
01e98bbd-b402-48b0-b83e-142341a39b2d
Rushby, Tom
bdb7715f-0331-491c-a9dd-5835f30b0bf8
Bahaj, Abubakr
a64074cc-2b6e-43df-adac-a8437e7f1b37
James, Patrick
da0be14a-aa63-46a7-8646-a37f9a02a71b
Anderson, Ben
01e98bbd-b402-48b0-b83e-142341a39b2d
Rushby, Tom
bdb7715f-0331-491c-a9dd-5835f30b0bf8
Bahaj, Abubakr
a64074cc-2b6e-43df-adac-a8437e7f1b37
James, Patrick
da0be14a-aa63-46a7-8646-a37f9a02a71b

Anderson, Ben, Rushby, Tom, Bahaj, Abubakr and James, Patrick (2021) The effects of LED light bulb installation on electricity demand in UK households: results of a large n randomised control trial. Energy Evaluation Europe: 2021 Europe Conference: Accelerating the energy transition for all: Evaluation's role in effective policy making, Online. 10 - 16 Mar 2021.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Energy efficiency is a critical component in any strategy to reduce the need for expensive GHG-intensive peak demand generation in the UK and elsewhere and reduce the need for capital intensive local distribution network reinforcement. Lighting currently consumes approximately 15% of total electricity consumption in the UK ranging from 6 to 15% for electrically heated and non-electrically heated households respectively and 14% of peak winter load . Increasing lighting efficiency could therefore offer substantial sustained residential demand reduction coinciding with known patterns of (especially) winter peak demand. In this paper we report analysis of a large-scale UK randomised-controlled trial which tested the effect of LED lightbulb installation on temporal electricity consumption in winter and estimated the consumer and network benefits of doing so.

Text
EEE 2021_ExtendedAbstract_Anderson_Ben_LED_trials - Version of Record
Download (338kB)
Text
EEE2021_Presentation_Anderson_LEDs - Other
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (2MB)

More information

Published date: 11 March 2021
Venue - Dates: Energy Evaluation Europe: 2021 Europe Conference: Accelerating the energy transition for all: Evaluation's role in effective policy making, Online, 2021-03-10 - 2021-03-16

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447705
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447705
PURE UUID: 05fb1db8-7644-4fca-a8bf-8f553a5395d1
ORCID for Ben Anderson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2092-4406
ORCID for Tom Rushby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3686-5140
ORCID for Abubakr Bahaj: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0043-6045
ORCID for Patrick James: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2694-7054

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Mar 2021 17:52
Last modified: 19 Mar 2021 02:44

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×