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The role of digital media in the electromobility transition

The role of digital media in the electromobility transition
The role of digital media in the electromobility transition
Road transport is a major contributor to air pollution in the UK (DEFRA, 2019) with serious effects on public health (DEFRA and DfT, 2017), and a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions (DECC, 2016). Measures to mitigate this environmental – and social – impact must be taken for the UK to achieve its targets for decarbonising transport and to reduce harmful emissions. Introducing electric vehicles (EVs) is key to tackling air quality (BEISC, 2018); and these offer heightened advantages in combination with renewable energy management and storage (Hall and Lutsey, 2017), and deployment in networked multi-modal transport systems or vehicle-sharing services (Urry and Dennis, 2009).

Digital connectivity and communications systems are an enabling factor in such hypothetical smart transportation futures. However, while digital media tools and technologies such as smartphone apps and social media platforms are believed to prompt new practices and behaviours among users of other transport modes (i.e. Pawlak et al., 2015), more knowledge of their influence or effects is needed with specific reference to EV driving.

Quantitative and qualitative data collected in this research have provided insight into demographic, attitudinal and behavioural characteristics of the early-innovator EV community. A typology has been created to chronologically itemise and delineate the EV-specific journeymaking process, including digitally-mediated interventions. Drivers’ engagement with digital media has been correlated against reported behaviour changes or certain adaptations in household routines, habits and practices since driving an EV. User segmentation and archetypal EV driver personas have been developed, informing models mapping driver behaviour and digital engagement to appropriate implementation of new and upcoming technologies; and recommendations have been made relevant to stakeholders including vehicle and user experience designers; service and infrastructure providers; and developers of mobility or transportation systems.

Considered in the theoretical context of the Multi-Level Perspective (MLP) on socio-technical transitions (Geels, 2002), the conclusion finds that while niche-level activity has encouraged and supported early-innovators and initial experimentation, technologies from established regimelevel companies and service providers are crucial for more mainstream EV adoption; but digital media alone cannot accelerate the transition to electromobility.
University of Southampton
Alkhalisi, Andrea Farah
f8dc3696-0963-41da-ae01-c08d066f7f45
Alkhalisi, Andrea Farah
f8dc3696-0963-41da-ae01-c08d066f7f45
Waterson, Benedict
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286

Alkhalisi, Andrea Farah (2020) The role of digital media in the electromobility transition. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 258pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Road transport is a major contributor to air pollution in the UK (DEFRA, 2019) with serious effects on public health (DEFRA and DfT, 2017), and a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions (DECC, 2016). Measures to mitigate this environmental – and social – impact must be taken for the UK to achieve its targets for decarbonising transport and to reduce harmful emissions. Introducing electric vehicles (EVs) is key to tackling air quality (BEISC, 2018); and these offer heightened advantages in combination with renewable energy management and storage (Hall and Lutsey, 2017), and deployment in networked multi-modal transport systems or vehicle-sharing services (Urry and Dennis, 2009).

Digital connectivity and communications systems are an enabling factor in such hypothetical smart transportation futures. However, while digital media tools and technologies such as smartphone apps and social media platforms are believed to prompt new practices and behaviours among users of other transport modes (i.e. Pawlak et al., 2015), more knowledge of their influence or effects is needed with specific reference to EV driving.

Quantitative and qualitative data collected in this research have provided insight into demographic, attitudinal and behavioural characteristics of the early-innovator EV community. A typology has been created to chronologically itemise and delineate the EV-specific journeymaking process, including digitally-mediated interventions. Drivers’ engagement with digital media has been correlated against reported behaviour changes or certain adaptations in household routines, habits and practices since driving an EV. User segmentation and archetypal EV driver personas have been developed, informing models mapping driver behaviour and digital engagement to appropriate implementation of new and upcoming technologies; and recommendations have been made relevant to stakeholders including vehicle and user experience designers; service and infrastructure providers; and developers of mobility or transportation systems.

Considered in the theoretical context of the Multi-Level Perspective (MLP) on socio-technical transitions (Geels, 2002), the conclusion finds that while niche-level activity has encouraged and supported early-innovators and initial experimentation, technologies from established regimelevel companies and service providers are crucial for more mainstream EV adoption; but digital media alone cannot accelerate the transition to electromobility.

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Published date: August 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447747
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447747
PURE UUID: c627943f-0998-46e9-92ae-f855418a12a3
ORCID for Benedict Waterson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-7119

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Date deposited: 19 Mar 2021 17:31
Last modified: 20 Mar 2021 02:36

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Contributors

Thesis advisor: Benedict Waterson ORCID iD

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