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Prevalence and factors associated with overweight and obesity in selected health areas in a rural health district in Cameroon: a cross-sectional analysis

Prevalence and factors associated with overweight and obesity in selected health areas in a rural health district in Cameroon: a cross-sectional analysis
Prevalence and factors associated with overweight and obesity in selected health areas in a rural health district in Cameroon: a cross-sectional analysis
Background
Overweight and obesity are major public health problems worldwide, with projections suggesting a proportional increase in the number of affected individuals in developing countries by the year 2030. Evidence-based preventive strategies are needed to reduce the burden of overweight and obesity in developing countries. We assessed the prevalence of, and factors associated with overweight and obesity in selected health areas in West Cameroon.

Methods
Data were collected from a community-based cross-sectional study, involving the consecutive recruitment of participants aged 18 years or older. Overweight and obesity were defined according to the WHO classification. The statistical software R (version 3.5.1, The R Foundation for statistical computing, Vienna, Austria) was used for statistical analysis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent factors associated with overweight and obesity, and obesity.

Results
Records of 485 participants were included for analysis. The age and sex-standardized prevalence of overweight, obesity, and overweight and obesity were 31.1% (95% CI, 27.0–35.2), 18.9% (95% CI, 14.9–22.9), and 50.1% (95% CI, 45.7–54.6), respectively. In multivariable analysis, being female (adjusted OR [aOR] = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.69–4.63), married (aOR = 3.90, 95% CI = 2.23–6.95), and having secondary or tertiary education (aOR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.77–6.17) were associated with higher odds of overweight and obesity, while current smokers had lower odds of overweight and obesity (aOR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.16–0.82) when compared to their respective counterpart. Compared to their respective reference categories, being female being (aOR = 3.74, 95% CI = 2.01–7.30), married (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI = 1.37–5.05) and having secondary or tertiary education (aOR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.00–4.23) were associated with higher odds of obesity after adjustments for confounding.

Conclusion
We observed a high prevalence of overweight and obesity in this study. The odds of overweight and obesity was higher in females, married participants, and those with higher levels of education. Community-based interventions to control overweight and obesity should consider targeting these groups.
1471-2458
Simo, Larissa Pone
3116895c-18ad-4699-a894-f9bdb3734242
Agbor, Valirie Ndip
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Temgoua, Francine Zeuga
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Fozeu, Leo Cedric Fosso
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Bonghaseh, Divine Tim
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Mbonda, Aime Gilbert Noula
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Yurika, Raymond
0758798b-5678-4cd6-8e1f-a524069ae7af
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred Worlanyo
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Mbanya, Dora
fa28708b-ce66-494a-abc1-0b105e910add
Simo, Larissa Pone
3116895c-18ad-4699-a894-f9bdb3734242
Agbor, Valirie Ndip
4271b4f5-a0fd-4251-aace-04fa3ccf3c4c
Temgoua, Francine Zeuga
f88a8af2-b9e0-4087-bf86-c368a9fe9208
Fozeu, Leo Cedric Fosso
a44f9396-479c-4727-bf70-a249a6b99793
Bonghaseh, Divine Tim
9f7eefa0-dbdd-463c-a168-636f6e1c3fee
Mbonda, Aime Gilbert Noula
5e0035f3-569a-4f7b-a2fb-f56d3145518d
Yurika, Raymond
0758798b-5678-4cd6-8e1f-a524069ae7af
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred Worlanyo
11fe21e7-431a-442b-a8c7-6a7cb05176d9
Mbanya, Dora
fa28708b-ce66-494a-abc1-0b105e910add

Simo, Larissa Pone, Agbor, Valirie Ndip, Temgoua, Francine Zeuga, Fozeu, Leo Cedric Fosso, Bonghaseh, Divine Tim, Mbonda, Aime Gilbert Noula, Yurika, Raymond, Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred Worlanyo and Mbanya, Dora (2021) Prevalence and factors associated with overweight and obesity in selected health areas in a rural health district in Cameroon: a cross-sectional analysis. BMC Public Health, 21 (1), [475]. (doi:10.1186/s12889-021-10403-w).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Overweight and obesity are major public health problems worldwide, with projections suggesting a proportional increase in the number of affected individuals in developing countries by the year 2030. Evidence-based preventive strategies are needed to reduce the burden of overweight and obesity in developing countries. We assessed the prevalence of, and factors associated with overweight and obesity in selected health areas in West Cameroon.

Methods
Data were collected from a community-based cross-sectional study, involving the consecutive recruitment of participants aged 18 years or older. Overweight and obesity were defined according to the WHO classification. The statistical software R (version 3.5.1, The R Foundation for statistical computing, Vienna, Austria) was used for statistical analysis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent factors associated with overweight and obesity, and obesity.

Results
Records of 485 participants were included for analysis. The age and sex-standardized prevalence of overweight, obesity, and overweight and obesity were 31.1% (95% CI, 27.0–35.2), 18.9% (95% CI, 14.9–22.9), and 50.1% (95% CI, 45.7–54.6), respectively. In multivariable analysis, being female (adjusted OR [aOR] = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.69–4.63), married (aOR = 3.90, 95% CI = 2.23–6.95), and having secondary or tertiary education (aOR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.77–6.17) were associated with higher odds of overweight and obesity, while current smokers had lower odds of overweight and obesity (aOR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.16–0.82) when compared to their respective counterpart. Compared to their respective reference categories, being female being (aOR = 3.74, 95% CI = 2.01–7.30), married (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI = 1.37–5.05) and having secondary or tertiary education (aOR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.00–4.23) were associated with higher odds of obesity after adjustments for confounding.

Conclusion
We observed a high prevalence of overweight and obesity in this study. The odds of overweight and obesity was higher in females, married participants, and those with higher levels of education. Community-based interventions to control overweight and obesity should consider targeting these groups.

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Accepted/In Press date: 7 February 2021
Published date: 10 March 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447837
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447837
ISSN: 1471-2458
PURE UUID: 5a897753-18ed-42de-9d22-af8e19a3b9c6
ORCID for Winfred Worlanyo Dotse-Gborgbortsi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7627-1809

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Date deposited: 24 Mar 2021 17:34
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:20

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Contributors

Author: Larissa Pone Simo
Author: Valirie Ndip Agbor
Author: Francine Zeuga Temgoua
Author: Leo Cedric Fosso Fozeu
Author: Divine Tim Bonghaseh
Author: Aime Gilbert Noula Mbonda
Author: Raymond Yurika
Author: Dora Mbanya

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