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The manual shift in phase: the impact of circadian phase on semi-autonomous driving. What can we learn from current understanding in manual driving?

The manual shift in phase: the impact of circadian phase on semi-autonomous driving. What can we learn from current understanding in manual driving?
The manual shift in phase: the impact of circadian phase on semi-autonomous driving. What can we learn from current understanding in manual driving?

Driving in the night is significantly more dangerous and it cannot be solely attributed to reduced visibility or sleep deprivation. It is also due to circadian changes in human cognitive performance. Semi-automated driving is slowly entering the market and is predicted to improve driving safety; however, it might also introduce new types of challenges. There is a paucity of research on the circadian influences on semi-automated driving. This work proposes an extended, multi-period, Consensus Model of the driver that includes circadian rhythmicity in semi-automated driving. The basis for the multi-period Consensus Model is the interpolation of the data from manual driving, and literature related to the circadian effect on the factors from the Consensus Model of the driver in automation. The results of the literature review stress the importance of circadian rhythmicity inclusion in research on vehicle automation.

accidents, automation, cars, circadian phase, circadian rhythmicity, consensus model, diurnal rhythmicity, fatigue, feedback, mental workload, multi-period model, night driving, semi-automated driving, semi-autonomous driving, vehicles
1463-922X
103-123
Kaduk, Sylwia I.
4faa8ddf-42f3-4f14-a5b6-a21e30eff0bd
Roberts, Aaron P. J.
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Kaduk, Sylwia I.
4faa8ddf-42f3-4f14-a5b6-a21e30eff0bd
Roberts, Aaron P. J.
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Kaduk, Sylwia I., Roberts, Aaron P. J. and Stanton, Neville A. (2021) The manual shift in phase: the impact of circadian phase on semi-autonomous driving. What can we learn from current understanding in manual driving? Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 22 (1), 103-123. (doi:10.1080/1463922X.2020.1758829).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Driving in the night is significantly more dangerous and it cannot be solely attributed to reduced visibility or sleep deprivation. It is also due to circadian changes in human cognitive performance. Semi-automated driving is slowly entering the market and is predicted to improve driving safety; however, it might also introduce new types of challenges. There is a paucity of research on the circadian influences on semi-automated driving. This work proposes an extended, multi-period, Consensus Model of the driver that includes circadian rhythmicity in semi-automated driving. The basis for the multi-period Consensus Model is the interpolation of the data from manual driving, and literature related to the circadian effect on the factors from the Consensus Model of the driver in automation. The results of the literature review stress the importance of circadian rhythmicity inclusion in research on vehicle automation.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 April 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 June 2020
Published date: 2 January 2021
Keywords: accidents, automation, cars, circadian phase, circadian rhythmicity, consensus model, diurnal rhythmicity, fatigue, feedback, mental workload, multi-period model, night driving, semi-automated driving, semi-autonomous driving, vehicles

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447951
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447951
ISSN: 1463-922X
PURE UUID: 6fed6659-b527-45f5-bb3e-01e0ef9ed90d
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2021 17:32
Last modified: 27 Mar 2021 02:43

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Contributors

Author: Sylwia I. Kaduk

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