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The circadian effect on psychophysiological driver state monitoring

The circadian effect on psychophysiological driver state monitoring
The circadian effect on psychophysiological driver state monitoring
Driving is an everyday activity but also brings a substantial risk. Driver state monitoring is a potential method to alleviate such risk by detecting unsafe driver states. Monitoring systems can infer a driver’s state based on physiological measurements, subjective report and/or performance. It is well-known that driver psychology, physiology and performance are affected by circadian rhythmicity independently from being affected by the psychological state. However, there is a paucity of research for the circadian effect on the interpretation of the driver state monitoring. This paper seeks to rectify this situation by reviewing the literature on the circadian effect on the physiological functions measured by the methods used in driver state monitoring. Systems tested in the laboratory as potential driver state monitoring and measures that are used to detect states are also considered. The findings suggest different circadian effects on electroencephalography, electrocardiography, electrooculography, electrodermal response, speech, event-related potential, electromyography, subjective report, blood pressure, facial expression, hormonal salivary content, body temperature, respiration, psychomotor performance, and body position. This study creates a theoretical basis for integrating studies about circadian rhythmicity into driver state monitoring. It shows the importance of circadian phase for the safety sciences, driver state monitoring, and systems design.
1463-922X
1-25
Kaduk, Sylwia I.
4faa8ddf-42f3-4f14-a5b6-a21e30eff0bd
Roberts, Aaron P. J.
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Kaduk, Sylwia I.
4faa8ddf-42f3-4f14-a5b6-a21e30eff0bd
Roberts, Aaron P. J.
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Kaduk, Sylwia I., Roberts, Aaron P. J. and Stanton, Neville A. (2020) The circadian effect on psychophysiological driver state monitoring. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 1-25. (doi:10.1080/1463922X.2020.1842548).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Driving is an everyday activity but also brings a substantial risk. Driver state monitoring is a potential method to alleviate such risk by detecting unsafe driver states. Monitoring systems can infer a driver’s state based on physiological measurements, subjective report and/or performance. It is well-known that driver psychology, physiology and performance are affected by circadian rhythmicity independently from being affected by the psychological state. However, there is a paucity of research for the circadian effect on the interpretation of the driver state monitoring. This paper seeks to rectify this situation by reviewing the literature on the circadian effect on the physiological functions measured by the methods used in driver state monitoring. Systems tested in the laboratory as potential driver state monitoring and measures that are used to detect states are also considered. The findings suggest different circadian effects on electroencephalography, electrocardiography, electrooculography, electrodermal response, speech, event-related potential, electromyography, subjective report, blood pressure, facial expression, hormonal salivary content, body temperature, respiration, psychomotor performance, and body position. This study creates a theoretical basis for integrating studies about circadian rhythmicity into driver state monitoring. It shows the importance of circadian phase for the safety sciences, driver state monitoring, and systems design.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 October 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 November 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447952
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447952
ISSN: 1463-922X
PURE UUID: 590b1492-7f4f-4693-a106-8d07a8a67a37
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2021 17:33
Last modified: 27 Mar 2021 02:43

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Author: Sylwia I. Kaduk

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